October 24

GD NASSCO Cuts First Steel for TOTE’s LNG-Powered …

first_img Print  Close TOTE, February 26, 2014 zoom The construction of TOTE, Inc.’s new Marlin Class, the first LNG-powered containership in the world, began at the General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard in San Diego, Calif.“These ships, will be the most advanced, environmentally progressive vessels of their kind,” state Representative Duncan Hunter (R-CA), Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation said, “but they also represent $350 million in U.S. investment, 600 American shipyard jobs, and the bright future of the indispensable domestic maritime industry.”The Marlin class vessels mark a new age in American shipbuilding. TOTE’s back to back announcements in 2012 – converting its existing RO/RO fleet in Alaska and investing in new containerships for the Puerto Rico trade, began what can only be described as a change of tide in the U.S. maritime industry toward LNG as the new maritime fuel. ­Clean burning, LNG offers unmatched environmental benefits, reducing emissions below even the world’s most stringent standards. The new Marlin class will create a reduction of sulfur dioxide (SOx) emissions by 98 percent, particulate matter (PM) by 99 percent, nitrous oxide (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) by 71 percent over TOTE’s ships currently operating in Puerto Rico.“The move to LNG fuel is no less significant than the evolution from sail to steam,” said Mark Tabbutt, Chairman of Saltchuk, TOTE’s parent company, “the Marlins represent the start of a new age in American maritime.”Speakers at the event included Representative Duncan Hunter; Acting Maritime Administrator, Chip Jaenichen; Chairman of Saltchuk, TOTE’s parent company, Mark Tabbutt, and Kevin Graney, General Manager of the NASSCO shipyard.“We are excited to begin construction of the lead ship on this historic project,” said Fred Harris, president of General Dynamics NASSCO. “All of the stakeholders on this first-of-a-kind program, including NASSCO, our Korean partners DSEC, TOTE, ABS, and the USCG, are completely focused on its success. We are beginning construction at a level of design, planning and material readiness that is unsurpassed.”The Marlins, which will home port in Jacksonville, Florida, will enter service in late 2015 and early 2016. TOTE recently announced it entered into an agreement with Pivotal LNG and WesPac Midstream to provide LNG to the ships. My location 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定last_img read more

September 25

Police are not recording fifth of reported crimes

first_img“Although the force has implemented the recommendations from our previous crime recording inspection in 2014, we found that almost one in five crimes in Thames Valley are not being recorded properly – that equates to approximately 35,200 crimes a year.“It now needs to ensure that it records crimes at the earliest opportunity, and that there is proper supervision of crime recording decisions.”  One in five crimes reported to the police are not being recorded by officers, according to new figures, leading to victims being “deprived” of justice.Rape and violence are among the thousands of crimes that are not recorded by the police, a watchdog warned. Inspectors who are reviewing crime data for every police force in England found that at Thames Valley Police (TVP), one of the largest forces in the country, 35,200 crimes were not recorded per year. The force has been graded “inadequate” at recording crime by a watchdog which found only about 80 percent of crimes that were reported were recorded. Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS) found that at TVP only 69.2% of reported violent crimes were recorded, meaning over 13,900 reports are not recorded.HM Inspector of Constabulary Zoe Billingham said: “I am disappointed with the quality of crime recording in Thames Valley. Credit:Alamy Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Thames Valley Police record approximately 80% of crime All crimes are reported by an incident log, however failing to record an incident can lead to resources being misallocated and not all incidents being investigated.The data revealed that out of 174 rape reports, only 152 were accurately recorded.Thames Valley Police said it accepted the findings and will be addressing the concerns raised.The watchdog also published findings from North Yorkshire where it estimated that the force fails to record 9,200 reported crimes a year, including sexual offences, domestic abuse and rape. Inspector of Constabulary Matt Parr said: “As it stands today, we estimate almost one in five crimes in North Yorkshire are not properly recorded. This is simply inexcusable.”The force has robust processes in place to ensure the safeguarding of victims of these crimes, but too many offences continue to go unrecorded and therefore not investigated properly.”The force is potentially depriving victims of the services and justice to which they are entitled.”The findings are the latest from a series of rolling inspections looking at the crime data “integrity” of every police force in England and Wales.Inspectors launched the programme in November 2015 after finding the national average of under-recording of crimes stood at an “inexcusably poor” 19%. Credit:Ben Lack North Yorkshire policelast_img read more

September 22

Man due in court in connection with Rathmines assault

first_imgA MAN WILL appear in court later this morning to be charged in connection with an assault in the Dublin 6 area yesterday.At about 12.30am on 6 January, a 22-year-old woman who was walking down Effra Road was attacked by a man from behind. He punched her in the face before she managed to escape.Following the incident, a man in his late 40s was arrested and questioned at Terenure Garda Station. He will appear before the Courts of Criminal Justice.The victim was taken to hospital after the attack but her injuries are not thought to be serious.Related: Woman attacked in Dublin overnightlast_img read more