August 12

Lyme Regis to showcase international girls’ golf

first_img Tags: England, Europe, Lyme Regis Lyme Regis Golf Club in Dorset will be a showcase for girls’ golf this week when talented young players from across England and Europe challenge for national titles.A total of 144 golfers from 11 countries will play in the English U16 and U14 girls’ championships from Tuesday to Thursday, 7-9 August. In addition, 20 girls will compete for the title of England’s most improved girl golfer in the Abraham Trophy final on Monday 6 August.It’s the first time the club has hosted a national event and it promises to be memorable. Past champions include the Solheim Cup players Georgia Hall and Charley Hull.There’s a strong contingent of Dorset girls in the two championships. There are four players from Broadstone – Meg Walker, Chloe Haesler, Sienna Birch and Louise Burke – while other local girls are Hermione Christey-Clover (Ashley Wood), Lili Horn (Ferndown), Scarlett Williams (Parkstone) and Elizabeth Ashford (Sherborne).Other English players include Rosie Belsham of Whitley Bay, Northumberland, who has recently represented England in the European Young Masters and the R&A’s Junior Open.Staffordshire’s Hannah Golding (Brocton Hall) tasted high profile success last year when she was in the winning team in the Bridestone Chase Your Dream Trophy, run by England Golf, and payed in the pro-am of the British Masters supported by Sky Sports. She also met her idol Charley Hull at the event.The European players include Italy’s Charlotte Cattaneo who is defending the U14 crown she won last year.The U16 championship will be played over 72 holes; the U14 over 54 holes. Both tournaments end on Thursday, 9 August.The Abraham Trophy competitors include Surrey’s Lottie Woad (Farnham) who won the Trophy last year, while Meg Walker will represent Dorset. The competitors have all qualified for the final on the basis on handicap reduction. 5 Aug 2018 Lyme Regis to showcase international girls’ golf last_img read more

August 2

UNIQUE BELLA GLIDES TO 7 ½ LENGTH TRIUMPH IN GRADE II, $200,000 SANTA YNEZ STAKES AS SMITH & HOLLENDORFER TEAM FOR SEVEN FURLONG WIN IN 1:22.21

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 8, 2017)–Unique Bella demolished four rivals in taking Sunday’s Grade II, $200,000 Santa Ynez Stakes at Santa Anita by 7 ½ lengths under Mike Smith.  Assuming command three furlongs from home, Unique Bella’s only race from that point to the wire was with the clock, which stopped at 1:22.21 for seven furlongs.  A rousing 10 ¼ length maiden winner in her second start on Nov. 26 at Del Mar, she provided trainer Jerry Hollendorfer with his second consecutive win in the Santa Ynez and she already has fans and media alike wondering if she could be as good as her 4-year-old stablemate, superstar filly Songbird.“I’m just blessed, that’s all I can say,” said Smith when asked if he thought Unique Bella might be as good as soon-to-be two time Eclipse Champion Songbird.  “Now, it’s more reasonable to compare her (to Songbird).  Again, she’s very, very talented but with room to grow.  Hopefully with each step, she’ll get smarter about certain things.“When I saw everyone else send, I thought it was a good time to take a hold of her and see what happens.  It didn’t seem to bother her.  When we hit the far turn, it was like she was breathing different air.  The decisions I make are quick, but you have to make it all seem casual…”Although she had been odds-on throughout the post parade, Unique Bella ended up going off at even money in the short field of 3-year-old fillies, as a massive amount of money to win came in on eventual third place finisher Shane’s Girlfriend.  As a result, Unique Bella paid $4.00, $2.60 and $2.10.Owned by Don Alberto Stable, Unique Bella, a Kentucky-bred daughter of Tapit, from the Unbridled’s Song mare Unrivaled Belle, is now two for three and with the winner’s share of $120,000, has earnings of $162,400.“Today, she showed that she’s brilliant,” said Hollendorfer.  “We thought she’d jump out of there a little better.  I thought she would be close to the lead.  Mike used his judgement, got behind and then got to the outside, so it worked out well…We purposely waited this long with her and pointed towards this race.  I don’t know if we’ve seen all there is to Unique Bella, but I’ll ask Mike.”Also trained by Hollendorfer and a 10-length maiden special weight winner in her second start on Dec. 18 at Los Alamitos, It Tiz Well made a good run through the lane to be second, 2 ½ lengths in front of Shane’s Girlfriend.Ridden by Drayden Van Dyke, It Tiz Well was off at 12-1 and paid $5.80 and $2.60.Trained by Doug O’Neill and ridden by Flavien Prat, Shane’s Girlfriend was shortening up off a 13 ¼ length win in the one mile Grade III Delta Downs Princess Stakes on Nov. 19, but was never a threat to the winner today.  Off at 4-5, she finished 2 ½ lengths in front of Princess Karen and paid $2.10 to show.Fractions on the race, which was run on a main track that had been upgraded to fast, were 22.33, 44.58 and 1:09.28.Santa Anita will open for a five-day week on Thursday with first post time at 1 p.m.  Admission gates will open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

November 29

San Miguel sends Alaska to 6th straight loss

first_imgBREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games Turkey seeks arrest of NBA star Kanter – report BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds MOST READ Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Beermen bounced back from a 107-99 loss to the Barangay Ginebra Gin Kings on Sunday and they did it with a strong third quarter, outscoring the Aces, 31-18.Marcio Lassiter and Chris Ross added 19 and 18 points, respectively, while Arwind Santos nearly posted a double-double with 10 points and eight rebounds for San Miguel, which tied Ginebra in second place with a 7-2 card.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingThe Aces, who missed the services of Calvin Abueva and JVee Casio, have now lost six consecutive games after going 4-0 to start the conference. Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast View comments Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ PBA IMAGESAlex Cabagnot led five San Miguel players in double-figures and the Beermen dominated the Alaska Aces, 109-97, in the 2017 PBA Commissioner’s Cup Saturday night at Ynares Center in Antipolo.Cabagnot, the veteran point guard, fired a game-high 25 points and had 10 rebounds, six assists and three steals while import Charles Rhodes also notched a double-double with 24 points and 10 rebounds.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

November 7

Sport Education – Coach and Referee course presenter update

first_imgTouch Football Australia has been undertaking a review of Sport Education courses and resources and is pleased to provide further update with regard to the process for release and trialling the updated Foundation Coach Course and Level 1 Referee Course.As part of this trial process, the educating and updating of Presenters with the new course material and requirements is vital. This will be undertaken through a targeted approach which will include the following steps:1. TFA and state offices to identify and target relevant level course presenters and communicate directly requirements listed below.2. Course Presenters to register to update their accreditation as per Course Presenter updating Registration process as outlined in the TFA Sport Education Guidelines3. Course Presenters are required to complete relevant ASC General Principles Course (coaching or officiating) http://learning.ausport.gov.au/ and provide certificate to complete currency update process to [email protected] Course Presenters are required to attend and complete webinar workshop to be updated on the changes to the materials and course processes. To register to attend the webinar please select the link from the list below for your preferred date.The following webinar options will be held throughout September/early October to update Course Presenters. Further dates or potential face to face opportunities will be provided in due course. Foundation Coach Course http://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/5942e7 Foundation Coach Course http://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/dd97b7 Registration Link Thursday 3rd October – 7pm AEST Level 1 Referee Course Monday 30th September – 7pm AEST http://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/3d07e6 Thursday 26th September – 7pm AEST http://events.redbackconferencing.com.au/9a3e1b Date & Time Presenter Update Tuesday 24th September – 8pm AEST Level 1 Referee Course For more information, please click on the attached memo.Related Filescoach_and_referee_course_presenter_update_-_webinar_registration-pdfRelated LinksSport Educationlast_img read more

October 24

Tourism Minister Highlights Need for Increased Funding for Tourism

first_img Bolstered by her love for the outdoors, an innate passion for forests and a deep appreciation for the sector’s value to the environment, Ms. Headley has led the Department for 21 years, seeing it through many changes, most notably its transition to an executive agency in 2007. “Being a female in the Forestry Department had always been like ‘who are you and what do you know’,” Ms. Headley says in an interview with JIS News. Story Highlights In 1996, Marilyn Headley made history by becoming the first female Conservator of Forests in Jamaica and the Commonwealth. In 1996, Marilyn Headley made history by becoming the first female Conservator of Forests in Jamaica and the Commonwealth.“They used to say, you don’t look like a forester; so I would always say, how is a forester supposed to look?” she relates to JIS News.The appointment as head of the Forestry Department – all the more meaningful, as she was returning to the agency, which kick-started her career – would set the forest sector on its current path to being foremost in the country’s drive towards sustained growth and development.Her appointment might also have served as a catalyst for the addition of more female technical staff at the traditionally male-dominated Department.“Being a female in the Forestry Department had always been like ‘who are you and what do you know’,” Ms. Headley says in an interview with JIS News.Recalling her first stint at the Department in 1976, when she took a job as an Assistant to the then Deputy Director, having just completed her degree in Agriculture at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Ms. Headley says there were, at most, three females working in technical fields.Over the course of eight years, she served as civil culturist, research officer and senior research officer at the agency.Still, she was eager for more opportunities to grow professionally, and moved to the Jamaica National Investment Promotions Limited (now Jamaica Promotions Corporation), where she worked as an Agricultural Marketing Officer.That agency transferred her to its Miami office, where, for eight years, she would work as the Agricultural Officer for the North American region.Upon her return to the Forestry Department in 1996, however, she was disappointed to find that the female-to-male ratio had not seen much improvement over the years.The gender gap would, however, begin to improve, following Ms. Headley’s appointment as Conservator. This, she says, was due in part to a Canadian-funded ‘Trees for Tomorrow’ project, which had a module focused on how gender was reflected at the organisation.The Conservator makes it clear that while she made no direct effort to bring in more females, she made sure qualified women were equally considered for technical positions as men.“I am not going to hire you just because you are female, but if you are qualified, gender should not hinder you from being considered,” she points out.With the number of women leaving universities qualified in technical areas increasing, she is proud to note that the female cohort at the Forestry Department also increased exponentially.Ms. Headley tells JIS News that some 40 per cent of technical positions at the Department are now filled by women, up from 1.5 per cent in the 1990s. She notes that several members of the senior management team are also female.“That is what I call improvement, in that everybody can now feel like they too can be a Conservator. It is important for people to feel that when they come in, there is room for them to move up,” she points out.Bolstered by her love for the outdoors, an innate passion for forests and a deep appreciation for the sector’s value to the environment, Ms. Headley has led the Department for 21 years, seeing it through many changes, most notably its transition to an executive agency in 2007.She was appointed Chief Executive Officer and reinstated as Conservator of Forests following the shift, which she describes as an achievement of which she is particularly proud.She is also happy to have been able to bring the forest sector to the forefront of public awareness, which she hopes will foster greater recognition of the importance of forests in mitigating climate change, protecting the country’s infrastructure from flooding and to overall safeguard the environment.It was in the 2000s that she introduced the community participation initiative, where foresters were encouraged to get persons involved in protecting the resource. “Getting people involved, getting the stakeholders to meet, getting the views of the public – all this was new to the Forestry Department,” she points out.She adds that the expansion of the agency, to include posts for lawyers, sociologists, public-awareness specialists, and others, was also significant in revolutionising the way the Department operates.“This is very much in line with the global trend of how we must see forestry,” Ms. Headley says.She expresses confidence in the team at the Forestry Department and its capability to take the agency forward, especially through the implementation of the National Conservation Forest Management Plan, now before the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation for approval.“I think we are on a good track. We have here some bright young people… . I feel comfortable that this generation is ready to take the plan to 2026 and beyond,” she tells JIS News.Reflecting on her contribution to the public sector, she expresses satisfaction with her journey.“As a career civil servant, I find that I have been able to contribute in a lot of ways and to make a difference in the country and the sector,” she notes.She says her motto for success, inspired by a teacher from her youth, has been to always aim high.“Anything you are doing, always aim just a little beyond,” the CEO and Forest Conservator says.last_img read more

October 18

IAF completes first level of selecting astronauts for Gaganyaan mission from its

first_imgNew Delhi: The Indian Air Force has completed the first level of selecting astronauts for the ambitious Gaganyaan mission from its pool of test pilots.The test pilots underwent necessary extensive physical exercise tests, lab investigations, radiological tests, clinical tests and evaluation on various aspects of their psychology, it said on Friday.Air Force sources said 25 test pilots were part of the initial selection process.This will be a multi-layered selection process and only 2-3 test pilots will make it to the final list, the sources added. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM'”#MissionGaganyaan -IAF completed Level-1 of Indian Astronaut selection at Institute of Aerospace Medicine. Selected Test Pilots underwent extensive physical exercise tests, lab investigations, radiological tests, clinical tests & evaluation on various facets of their psychology,” the IAF tweeted.The first Gaganyaan flight scheduled for 2022 will carry three astronauts, who will be picked from among the test pilots in the armed forces.”Most maiden missions undertaken by different countries in the past had test pilots. So we are sticking to that for our maiden mission. We are also looking at test pilots from the armed forces which don’t have woman as test pilots,” an ISRO official said.The short-listed candidate is being done in batches and the candidates will be sent to Russia for training after November.India’s first man in space Rakesh Sharma, who flew aboard the Soyuz T-11, launched on April 2, 1984, was an Indian Air Force pilot.The ambitious Gaganyaan mission was announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi during his Independence Day speech in 2018.last_img read more

October 12

Cong hand in glove with anti-nationals, alleges Adityanath

first_imgAmbikapur (C’garh): Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath accused the Congress of being hand in glove with anti-nationals, and said its manifesto for the Lok Sabha election promotes terrorism and Naxalism. Addressing an election rally in Ambikapur town under the Surguja Lok Sabha constituency in Chhattisgarh, he also alleged that the Congress government in the state was not serious about tackling Naxalism and the killing of BJP MLA Bheema Mandavi in an IED blast in Dantewada earlier this week was its example. “Congress’ manifesto is an encouragement to terrorism and Naxalism. Congress ka hath deshdrohiyo ke sath (Congress is hand in glove with anti-nationals),” Adityanath said. “Lord Ram is associated with the memories of Ayodhya and Chhattisgarh but some people are now denying the existence of Ram. Congress is raising questions over the existence of Ram. It was the Congress that raised questions over the Ram Setu and tried then to destroy it,” he said. Time has come to teach a lesson to those who raise questions over the existence of Ram, he said, adding, “We will avenge the insult of lord Ram.” Highlighting various schemes launched by the BJP-led central government, he said, “Modi ji has been working to fulfil the dream of ‘ek bharat, shrestha (superior) bharat’.” The Congress government is not serious in tackling terrorism and Naxalism and the recent killing of BJP MLA is its example. “If you want to see law and order then come to Uttar Pradesh,” he said. Mandavi and four police personnel were killed on April 9 in a Naxal attack in Dantewada district of the state. “Had the BJP been in power now, this (Naxal attack on BJP MLA) could have been avoided,” he said. Adityanath also accused the Congress of denying benefits of the welfare schemes to the people in the state, he said, “Mafia raj of the Congress in the state is trying to end various schemes like Ayushman Bharat Yojana, meant to benefit the people, and were operational in the previous Raman Singh government.” In Chhattisgarh, mining and land mafias have become influential (after Congress came to power), he alleged. He also appealed to people to vote for Modi to make him the prime minister again. BJP has fielded its former MLA Renuka Singh in Surguja (ST) Lok Sabha constituency, which will go to polls in the third phase of election in the state on April 23. Congress has fielded its senior tribal leader and sitting MLA Khelsai Singh from the seat.last_img read more

October 12

Youth must shoulder greater responsibility: Naidu

first_imgChandigarh: Vice President M. Venkaiah Naidu on Sunday said that the youth must shoulder greater social responsibility of exercising judgement while looking at social issues. “We will be able to fully realize the vast demographic dividend in the years to come only if we can empower our youth with the right skills and attitudes,” Naidu told the 68th Convocation of Panjab University, of which he is the Chancellor, here. Urging the youth to adhere to traditions of tolerance and respect and protect the country’s pluralistic culture, Naidu said that India of the future would be powered by the dreams, ambitions, character and competence of young people. Also Read – NRI marriage bill referred to Parl’s standing panel on External Affairs He also urged the youth to use means of communication that technology has provided, responsibly. He emphasized that these modern means of communication must be used to facilitate social harmony and to cultivate a culture of healthy and civilized discussion on many of the pressing problems such as class and gender inequalities and the needs of the less privileged in society. “We need to address these problems with empathy and sincerity,” he added. Also Read – Cong slams govt on economy, says move beyond ‘piecemeal approach’ Naidu said that Panjab University had a glorious past and was one of the oldest universities in India, set in a land which has witnessed centuries of civilization and dedication to spreading knowledge in ancient centres of learning like Takshila. He expressed happiness at the university’s relentless quest for academic excellence and the rapid progress it has made in providing quality education to over thousands of students. He congratulated Panjab University for having secured the 34th position among all academic institutions in the nation in the recent rankings under the National Institutional Ranking Framework (NIRF). He applauded the University’s focused efforts towards cultivating innovation and entrepreneurship among students. “I am very happy that the university has been recognized by the UGC as the ‘University with potential for excellence in Biomedical Sciences’ with facilities for stem cell Research and Drug development,” he said. The Vice President proposed that there was a need to “rethink and re-orient our educational system in the context of the 21st century when the concerns of ecology, of human welfare and the welfare of the planet are equally imperative. “It is possible only if we turn our system around, including aspects of curriculum and evaluation, towards critical thinking,” he said. The Vice President also felicitated Dr. K. Sivan, Chairman of the Indian Space Research Organization who was honoured on the occasion with the Vigyan Ratna Award.last_img read more

September 30

Roundtable All Of Baseball History Should Get An Asterisk

It always comes back to the use of performance-enhancing drugs. The “steroid era” may be over, but Major League Baseball is still dealing with its consequences. At the National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony over the weekend, Craig Biggio was the only batter among the four new inductees. Although some of the greatest hitting records in the history of the sport occurred in the past 20 years, many position players can’t catch a break with Hall voters.So we ran a SurveyMonkey Audience poll asking Americans how they feel about steroids, amphetamines and the pre-integration era and then gathered FiveThirtyEight’s baseball fans to talk about the results (the following transcript has been lightly edited for length and clarity):Walt Hickey: It’s pretty clear the vast majority of people — even baseball fans — are not comfortable with just letting the records stand. Of everyone surveyed, 88 percent thought the records should be struck down entirely or have an indicator that there was some funny business going on.Neil Paine: I’m not surprised the majority of those polled want something — anything — to be done about the numbers compiled during the steroid era. Baseball is the most statistical of all the major sports, and it has always loved to foster the notion that you could compare, say, Honus Wagner’s stats to those of Alex Rodriguez side by side, without any adjustment, and still make a meaningful comparison. Sabermetricians have long acknowledged this as naive; between park effects and era adjustments, there are plenty of ways baseball stats need to be tweaked to level the playing field between different generations of players. But even for the lay fan, the age of PEDs [performance-enhancing drugs] destroyed any pretense that unadjusted numbers could be freely compared between eras, and I think that fact alone upset traditionalists as much as anything else.Harry Enten: I must admit that steroids to me is a highly emotional issue. Many of the players we associate with steroids are people we also associate with being jerks — people like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and A-Rod. But the real question is: Where does it end? Is it that stats are changed? Are champions changed? There can be no doubt that many, if not all, of the champions for a period in the 1990s and 2000s had steroid users. We’re not going to go back and change winners. In a lot of this polling, people are making an emotional argument.Walt: I, on the other hand, could not care less about steroid use. I feel like this notion of the game as some platonic ideal that existed prior to the big bad performance enhancers showed up is patently false. Every era had its own competitive advantages, as we’ll talk about in a second, but it’s only the steroid issue — and not, you know, the players who had the competitive advantages of rampant stimulant use and not having to compete with black players — that seems to make people think The Game is not somehow Pure.Rob Arthur: I’m under no illusions the game of baseball is Pure (nor will it ever be), but I also don’t know if it was ever dirtier than it was during the steroid era. Cheating is and has always been rampant, both on and off the field, but with steroids, we have a means of cheating that seems particularly effective. You can see that both in the scientific literature, where steroids seem to improve strength by as much as 20 percent, but also on the baseball field, where we had some notable steroid users like Bonds smashing records left and right.Harry: But what about during the “deadball era” — specifically between 1912 (I think) and 1920, when you had the spitball among other things? Offensive numbers took a dive. There is clear physical evidence that a spitball (or scuffing the ball) is a big deal. Now using that wasn’t illegal when it first started, but neither were steroids. They are now, yet people look at them so much differently than the pitching statistics that were occurring in the 1910s.Rob: Harry, you definitely have a point. But I think one of the reasons steroids are so objectionable is because of the asymmetry they created between players: Some players who used them seemed to become almost inhumanly effective, others didn’t use them at all and gained no benefit, and still others used but didn’t improve substantially. When the spitball was legal, it was available to all pitchers, and I doubt that any pitcher’s spit was 50 percent more effective at decreasing offense than any other pitcher’s spit. (I am aware that once the spitball was banned, some players were grandfathered in and still allowed to use it. Obviously, that wouldn’t fly in the modern era.)Neil: And don’t even get me started debating whether Lasik surgery counts as “unnatural” and “performance-enhancing.”Walt: Yeah, Tommy John called — he wants his pitching speed back. We will get back to the 1920s era of baseball soon enough, Enten. For now: My favorite part of this was comparing how different fan bases cared about steroids based on how much their teams gained from steroid use.Editor’s Note: On Friday, we introduced the idea of a steroid “discount” — a penalty in percentage terms that would be deducted from players’ individual statistics if they were found to be using PEDs. Our poll asked respondents to recommend said discount, which we can also break down by team fandom.The following table is color-coded by how much (red) or how little (white) each team’s fans would penalize steroid-using players.1Specifically, players who were suspended for PED offenses, were linked to the Biogenesis scandal, were named in the Mitchell Report or whose failed drug tests were leaked to the media. Because some teams had far more fans respond than others — and some teams’ fans hardly voted at all — the columns have been color-coded to represent a combination of average response and the number of respondents. In other words, results have been regressed to the mean based on sample size. Likewise, the correlations at the bottom of the table were weighted by the number of respondents from each fan base.Walt: Hot damn, Giants.Neil: It’s interesting that, as fandom intensifies, a relationship does begin to materialize between how much the voter’s favorite team relied on steroid users and how much tolerance he or she has for steroid users’ stats.If we look at all of our survey’s respondents — including those who were and were not self-professed baseball fans — there’s essentially no relationship between team steroid reliance and how much steroid-tainted stats the voter would recommend taking away. But when you throw out non-fans, a small2Correlation: -0.2 relationship emerges. Fan bases whose stars used steroids to generate more wins, whether on a per-season basis or as a percentage of the team’s total, tended to want steroid users to be punished less.Then again, it’s a slight relationship at best. While San Francisco Giants fans — hello Barry Bonds! — wanted juicers dinged much less than the average fan base, fans of the Oakland Athletics and Chicago Cubs (who rank fourth and fifth in the degree to which they were helped by steroid-using batters) asked for some of the highest penalties of any group of rooters.But that’s not the only way to measure the cognitive dissonance between a fan’s acceptance of steroids and the degree to which his or her team benefited from them.Walt: I whipped this up really quickly: It’s the scatterplot of teams, with that “how much did they gain from PEDs” metric plotted against the percentage of their fan base that said they thought the records of steroid users should be struck. What an interesting relationship:Walt: It’s a small sample size, but I really love that fans of teams that didn’t gain a lot from PEDs seem more likely to desire retribution against players who did.Rob: The relationship between steroid contribution and desire for retribution is really fascinating and upholds a long-held suspicion of mine. It also suggests (again) that these attitudes are largely driven by emotions: If my team benefited, then steroids were OK, but if not, steroids were terrible! It shows that fans, in particular, have a hard time divorcing their own fandom from the questions about how much steroids benefited particular players and how much we should care as a result.Walt: So then the question becomes where do we draw the line when it comes to performance-enhancing things in each era? I personally think it’s bullshit that people get so riled up about steroids and not, for instance, the widespread amphetamine use in MLB in the era prior to it.It turns out America agrees!Walt: So, Neil, who would this affect?Neil: Like you said, it’s pretty widely acknowledged that amphetamine use was prevalent in MLB throughout much of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. During a 1985 drug trial, former Mets and Pirates first baseman John Milner testified that he had received “greenies” (amphetamines) from Hall of Famers Willie Mays and Willie Stargell at various times during his career, and Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt said the substance was “widely available in major-league clubhouses” when he played.So it’s at least possible — if not probable — that some of that era’s greatest superstars used a now-banned substance to sharpen their focus and boost their energy levels. (Even if the evidence is mixed over whether greenies actually even help athletic performance.)Walt: I feel like higher focus and higher energy is probably a nice thing for batters to have. I imagine their record collections were remarkably well-organized as well.I’m pretty happy to see some consistency here. I compared how people answered the steroid question with how they answered the stimulant question, and 88 percent of respondents (and 86 percent of fans) stuck to their guns and replied with the same answer they gave for steroid policy. It seems like at least among the general population there’s a lot more consistency with how to handle the policy than there is in the league.Still, it’s surprising that at the end of the day, 44 percent of Americans would strip away statistical accomplishments from amphetamine users in the era of Willie Mays, Hank Aaron and Mickey Mantle.Neil: Agreed. The general attitude among sportswriters — even if it doesn’t necessarily make sense — is that there’s a distinction to be drawn between the supposedly widespread amphetamine use of the 1970s and the supposedly widespread steroid use of the 1990s. But according to those surveyed, there shouldn’t be. The moral judgment of the people appears to fall on both groups with equal fury.Harry: I really do wonder whether most people know that Mays may have used greenies. I tend to think not. If they did, there is no way that the polling numbers would look the way they do. I also tend to think that there is nothing ridiculous that Mays did in the sense that he looked normal, unlike Bonds who looked like someone shoved some orthopedic pillows in his arms. Not to mention that his head grew bigger than Donald Trump’s ego. It seemed natural. We tend to think of unnatural in how someone looks, not how they think.Neil: Right, and the bulked-up players and shifting head sizes gave fans and analysts a smoking gun of sorts. It added to the theatrical nature of the steroid hysteria. With a pill that doesn’t change appearance, you’re reduced to poring over stats and wondering whether a player’s out-of-the-blue power spike is just a career year or something much more sinister.Walt: But enough with the pharmaceutical advantages. What about the bigoted regime that kept black players out of the leagues? What about the competitive advantage conferred by excluding athletes based on the color of their skin?Walt: Kind of odd that baseball fans are nowhere near as mortified with pre-integration records standing than they are with stimulants. Neil, what’s the word on the effect that segregation had on baseball?Neil: One of the biggest tragedies of baseball’s color line is that we can’t know precisely how much the game’s pre-1947 stars benefited from only playing against white opponents. But we can certainly estimate how much more shallow the pool of available players was before the game was integrated. (As well as before the rise of Latin America and, now, Asia as a source of baseball talent.)As FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver notes in “Baseball Between the Numbers,” MLB was only drawing from a population of about 300,000 people per player in 1930. By 1960, when baseball was finally fully integrated, that number had more than doubled to 625,000, and it was a whopping 900,000 when Nate crunched the numbers in 2005. The bigger the talent pool, the tougher the competition, so it’s clear that pre-integration players had a major advantage in terms of the relative caliber of talent they played against.(A related note: Baseball’s level of talent is steadily increasing anyway as humans push the boundaries of athletic performance, which is another great reason statistics from the past can’t be compared to modern numbers straight-up.)Harry: My opinion on this is fairly simple: You can’t penalize players for things they didn’t control. Babe Ruth couldn’t play against a black player in the MLB even if he wanted to. It’s a tragedy that we were robbed of seeing Josh Gibson against Carl Hubbell, but we can’t go back and readjust the records.Walt: I don’t think it’s so much about penalizing players for things beyond their control as it’s about knocking down the idea that baseball was somehow defiled by pharmaceuticals. This nostalgia for baseball is wholly misguided — the Boston Red Sox integrated after Southern public schools! In 1959! — it’s not like this was an antiquated part of baseball history.Baseball’s commitment to some idyllic game that never existed — something that also manifests itself in a knee-jerk opposition to potential ways to improve the game, like the DH, speedier play and other experimentation — by now constitutes what I think is (on a long enough timespan) an existential threat for the league. The fact that more people aren’t more willing to look back in anger is a symptom of a much larger problem.Not to mention that at least the other two advantages at least made the game more interesting to watch. Segregation, if anything, made the game less interesting for fans out of mere spite. My main line? If you’re going to get indignant about steroids — something that unambiguously made the game more interesting — at least have the decency to be just as indignant about letting those segregated records stand un-asteriskedBut guys! We’re missing the point here. About 10 percent of Americans would strip Babe Ruth of his records! Including 8 percent of baseball fans. That’s awesome.Harry: What percentage of people believe we didn’t land on the moon?Walt: I mean Kubrick basically admitted as much in “The Shining,” man — learn how to read subtext. read more