June 23

Chill-out chat with Will Genia

first_imgAUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 06: James O’Connor and Quade Cooper of the Australian Wallabies IRB Rugby World Cup 2011 team smile as they arrive at Auckland International Airport on September 6, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images) WG: Too much talking in meetings. I like them short and sharp. Our captain (James Horwill) can repeat himself a lot.RW: Who are your three dream dinner party guests? WG: Michael Jordan – I’m a massive fan. He was dedicated in every way to be as good as he could be. Nelson Mandela and Muhammad Ali.RW: What’s your dream holiday? WG: Going to Papua New Guinea to spend time with my family. My parents live there and I go back every Christmas to spend it with them.RW: And phobias? WG: Spiders. I scream like a girl if I see a spider. I don’t mind snakes. A friend of mine had a pet snake and I thought about getting one. My girlfriend has to get rid of the spiders. She picks them up and pretends to throw them at me!RW: What’s your favourite joke? WG: Here goes. What do you call a deer with no eyes? No eye-deer.RW: What can’t you live without? WG: There’s a lot I can’t live without. Underpants!RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? WG: Just to be happy and content with life, whatever I do.RW: How would you like to be remembered? WG: As someone who enjoyed and loved rugby.This article appeared in the December 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Will Genia – One of his nicknames is Midge, short for midgetRUGBY WORLD: So how did you enjoy your first RWC off the field? WILL GENIA: I loved it. We have a great group of boys and we make an effort to find a balance and organise activities. We had a relaxing few days with our partners in Hanmer Springs, a lovely mountain town.RW: What’s the best thing about NZ? WG: Just the fact that they love their rugby. That makes it a more exciting atmosphere with a World Cup.RW: And the worst? WG: The weather! Boys were kicking in training in Wellington and balls would fly back over their heads!RW: What would you save if your house was on fire? WG: Vanessa, my girlfriend; we’ve been together for four years and she takes care of me. My PlayStation; I’m the best in the team at FIFA 11 – that’s not a joke. And my iPhone; I like reggae music.RW: Who are the Wallabies’ jokers? WG: The old fella, Radike Samo. He’s 35 but acts like he’s 20. Quade Cooper, James O’Connor and Kurtley Beale like playing pranks too, especially Quade. He does little things like taking your clothes and hiding stuff.RW: What was the best practical joke at the World Cup? WG: In the team room we had computers and Digit (analyst Andrew Sullivan) must have left his Facebook account open because someone got on it and posted, ‘Oh my god, is it just me or is Robbie Deans the sexiest guy to walk this planet?’!RW: Who are the best and worst room-mates? WG: The best is Radike. He takes care of me and likes to keep things tidy. The worst is Digby Ioane – 100%. He doesn’t go to bed until 2.30-3am and he listens to music really loud and laughs like a hyena, so you can’t get to sleep.Terrible twosome: James O’Connor and Quade Cooper RW: Which team-mate spends the longest in front of the mirror? WG: There are two without doubt – Quade and James O’Connor. Quade hasn’t even got any hair but stands there sorting it out. James does his hair too and they’re both into their fashion.RW: What’s your most embarrassing moment? WG: Sending a love message to my mum instead of my girlfriend!RW: Any nicknames? WG: A lot. Sanchez, which is my first name. Dolph, as apparently I look like a dolphin when I’m doing a bench pull because my legs flip up. Midge, short for midget. And Pooh Bear.RW: What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch? WG: I wasn’t playing but I saw it on TV. Steve Thompson kissing that Argentina player after a scuffle! What the f***?RW: Do you have any bugbears? Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.last_img read more

June 23

RBS 6 Nations: The Alternative Awards

first_imgFrench prop Vincent Debaty (C) vies with Scottish players during the Six Nations International Rugby Union match France-Scotland at the Stade de France, in Saint-Denis, near Paris on March 16, 13. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURE (Photo credit should read LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images) I suppose David North doesn’t really need much invitation to come on down…Picture the scene. A packed out Parisian stadium; a tense contest between France and Wales; a pin-point chip kick is lofted over the static French defence, Samoan-thighed winger George North collects the pill and elegantly dabs down, despite the best efforts of a racing Francois Trinh-Duc. Then, out of nowhere, North’s father, in a moment of well, madness, hops a barrier, shimmies past security and hot-foots it over to pat his hulking son on the back, before being hauled off without his feet touching the ground. It’s a situation all teenagers recognise – remember North’s only 20 – as an ‘oh dad!’ moment.Well, we all get caught up…Best BarnetCarefully conditioned and combed to salon-quality perfection, a gorgeous mop of primrose locks sits atop the squat frame of a certain Richard Hibbard. That same ogrish hooker who thumped over from a few yards against Scotland without any discernable esprit and who has been burrowing into burly scrums with glee. Like his roof, he is a man with layers. Honourable mentions to Dimitri Szarzewski, and of course, ahem, The Baron.Big Hand for Picking Players Out of PositionLike floral shirts and sherry bars, picking players out of position is all the rage right now. I don’t get it (on all counts), but it’s big.Mike Brown on the wing; Sam Warburton at 6; Kelly Brown at 7; Wesley Fofana on the touchline; Yoann Huget at full-back; Freddie Michalak in a position different from the one he plays at club level; in fact any Frenchman who can be moved has been. Why? Because, we are French!Some make the most of it, some thrive and some make a pigs ear of it, remember poor Mauro Bergamasco being picked as a scrum-half against England in 2009, he’s only just recovering. Could this be one of the reasons the tournament lost coherence for a few weeks?Wrecking ball with a beard: France’s Vincent DebatyBest try saverThere are always plenty of candidates for best try of the tournament. But what about moments where certain disaster was averted? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Not so shy and retiring: Italian stalwart and facial-hair model Baron Andrea Lo Cicero Vaina on his last Azzurri bowBy Alan DymockTHE PARTY had to end some time. The fat lady is resting her shrill voice and the heroes of Cardiff’s street sweeping corps have earned their corn, but there is no more international rugby. Until the summer, that is.Let us live in the moment, though. Let us celebrate the madness and the maddening moments; the shrug-evoking cameos and the heady disharmony of delighted yelps and woeful whines.Here is Rugby World’s Alternative 6 Nations Awards!Unsung heroItalian institution Baron Andrea Lo Cicero has gracefully sashayed off the international stage for the last time. In 103 caps he has scored a creditable eight tries and was tromping around the paddock during Italy’s first ever away win in the Six Nations (against Scotland, unsurprisingly). He played at the coal face for the Barbarians and has represented Rovigo and L’Aquila on home turf, as well as Toulouse and is still thumping into Top 14 opponents with Racing Metro.He remains an inspiration to hirsute props around the globe, as well as continuing to be a style icon, with his flowing locks, whiskered face and fetching calf tattoo. Every prop should have the essence of The Baron. He will be sorely missed.Unsung villainDuring Lo Cicero’s last cap the band at the Stadio Olimpico had a polished-brass shocker, squeakily hashing the anthems and running out of sync with an inflamed crowd. For the Azzurri anthem they could have just gone a-capella, much like the Scots did halfway through Flower or Scotland. Or failing that, just push the aforementioned Lo Cicero out in front, with a cape, and let him effervesce up and down the touchline like a conductor, whipping the crowd into a heady frenzy. You know, the way international rugby should be.Hot heels: Flickmaster Zebo scores against WalesFlash of brilliance BouquetJust fling the posies at Simon Zebo’s sublime feet right now.Week one, all those weeks ago, saw a moment of instinctive brilliance as the Irish winger took a low pass on his outstretched heel, cycling forward as if he was mid-spinning class, and cupped the ball in his hands. In a nano-second, the Zebo flick was born. It was the kind of on-the-hoof magic that leads to many a shattered window as kids in playgrounds all around over home nations attempt to re-create the moment.Pewter Quaich for Best Cameo There are a few candidates. There was a sensational saving tackle from Mike Brown after North bulldozed past Chris Ashton and snarled his way up the park. There was a hit from Craig Gilroy in the first game which stopped Leigh Halfpenny from making used of a 3-on-1. Morgan Parra became the stick in the spokes as a rampaging Manu Tuilagi shrugged off several would-be French tacklers.However, the winner has to be Stuart Hogg, who risked potential liquidation as he hit the fridge on rollerskates that is the near 20st Vincent Debaty. Be grateful, Irish fans: that tackle meant that France finished bottom of the Championship rather than you.last_img read more

June 23

2019 Rugby World Cup Quarter-final: Japan 3-26 South Africa

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Keep track of events in Japan via our Rugby World Cup homepage.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Bloody-minded South Africa squeeze the life out of Japan and progress to the World Cup semi-finals In a nutshellThey made us wait for their strike, using brutal forwards and a monstrous maul, but South Africa are through to the semi-finals of the Rugby World Cup. 2019 Rugby World Cup Quarter-final: Japan 3-26 South AfricaHead-to-HeadPlayed – 3Japan wins –1Ireland wins – 2Most Recent Meeting – Japan 7-41 South AfricaMost of us will remember Japan rocking the Boks in 2015, when Karne Hesketh’s late try secured the Miracle of Brighton – a 34-32 shock to rugby’s system.But in the build-up to this World Cup, the two sides played again, in Kumagaya. The Springboks scored six tries to Japan’s one, dominating despite a yellow card for cynical play for Francois Louw late on. Makazole Mapimpi got a hat-trick, while Kotaro Matsushima got a consolation try.The match was also notable for the Boks for deliberately practicing a certain style of game, kicking ball away so they could work on their defending.Did you know?Japan are playing in their first ever quarter-final.South Africa have never failed to make it out of the pool in a World Cup.Coming into the quarter-finals, Kotaro Matsushima has scored the most tries in test matches in this calendar year, with nine.South Africa’s have won 20 matches and lost four in northern hemisphere World Cups. One of those four was against Japan, in Brighton.Handre Pollard is  South Africa’s all-time leading point-scorer, ahead of Percy Montgomery.center_img The hope was that they would physically hammer the hosts, and they did come out on top, but it took an hour to break them down. But they built a score and in a game of fine margins and stubborn play, it was sensible stuff from the South Africans.Japan have been incredible in this world Cup and no matter what come out of the tournament with credit, but their race was run and it felt at times during this game that they were sprinting to stand still. For all the movement and hard carries, South Africa soaked it up and rebounded the energy back on the Japanese.The first Springboks try came straight off first phase at set-piece time as Faf de Klerk fed Makazole Mapimpi. The wing shoved a hand-off at Yu Tamura, created the space and powered to the line.It will be mentioned in the coming days that South Africa could have been down to 14 men for the duration of the game, had the officials decided that Tendai Mtawarira’s tip tackle on opposite number Keita Inagaki at the ten-minute mark was more malicious than just a yellow-card. Wayne Barnes opted only to go for a sin-binning, though, and the hosts could only Related: Should Tendai Mtawarira have gotten a red card?There were plenty of kicks and more than a few knock-ons during a period of harem-scarem stuff and Lukhanyo Am butchered a certain score, but South Africa were happy to bide their time.Handre Pollard chipped away with penalty kicks and when Faf de Klerk was sent racing through for a second try off the back of a scary-strong maul, the Japanese resolve was gone.At the double: Wing Makazole Mapimpi on the attack (Getty Images)They have been a breath of fresh air all tournament, keeping us all guessing and hitting every run as hard as humanly possible. But the counter-attacking game of South Africa relished in that. Mapimpi’s second try was testament to this. Captain Siya Kolisi went in hard on a ball-carrying Asaeli Ai Valu and from the spilled ball. Pollard hit Willie le Roux and the full-back checked it off to his back-three mate. The lethal Mapimpi was set free again. He bounced away down the touchline, scoring to make it 21 unanswered points for the Boks.Japan stuck at it but this was as clinical as it gets.Sunday was a nervy old day, but the South Africans wilkl be confident heading into their semi with Wales.Star manSometimes you have to appreciate the numbers. Mapimipi is now joint-top try scorer in this competition, with five scores, and he looked dangerous every time he touched the ball.For all the physical exertions of the pack, Mapimpi did as much as anyone to suck defenders in and he looks hungry.Handre Pollard deserves credit for guiding his Boks side through this one calmly, and 11 points is a solid showing – he kept the scoreboard ticking over. But in a game all about control, the brief moments of excitement Mapimpi created are worth a nod.The ReactionJapan coach Jamie Joseph: “At half-time the boys were a bit down there were a few niggles in our group, but, at the end of the day, I am just so proud of my team – the courage, the tenacity the sheer determination those last two tackles show just how tight a group we are and I really must take my hat off to the team.” “Secondly, I’d really like to thank the fans. We wouldn’t be here if we didn’t have the support of the whole country, they have been absolutely marvelous.“I’m really proud of what we’ve achieved at the World Cup, we’ll accept that, we’ll enjoy that a little later on but I’m really disappointed for the players because they give so much to the group and they give so much to the country at this World Cup, I’m just a little disappointed.”South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus: “We’ve come a bit but we want to try and go all the way. Now we’ve got Wales they are ranked higher than us and they got a win against France this weekend, we’ll start tomorrow on them, but we’ll enjoy tonight and we know the next two weeks will be tough.”The TeamsJapan: Ryohei Yamanaka (Lomano Lemeki 59), Kotaro Matsushima, Timothy Lafaele, Ryoto Nakamura, Kenki Fukuoka; Yu Tamura (Rikiya Matsuda 47), Yutaka Nagare (Fumiaki Tanaka 71); Keita Inagaki (Isileli Nakajima 47), Shota Horie (Atsushi Sakate 72), Jiwon Koo (Asaeli Ai Valu 63), Luke Thompson (Wimpie van der Walt 54), James Moore, Michael Leitch (captain), Pieter Labuschagne (Amanaki Mafi 11), Kazuki Himeno.Pen: Tamura 20.South Africa: Willie Le Roux, Cheslin Kolbe (Frans Steyn 71), Lukhanyo Am, Damian De Allende, Makazole Mapimpi; Handre Pollard, Faf De Klerk (Herschel Jantjies 73), Tendai Mtawarira (Steven Kitschoff 54), Bongi Mbonambi (Malcolm Marx 37), Frans Malherbe (Vincent Koch 54), Eben Etzebeth (RG Snyman 62) 62), Lood De Jager (Franco Mostert 66), Siya Kolisi (captain) (Steven Kitschoff 11), Pieter-Steph Du Toit, Duane Vermeulen (Francois Louw 67).Try: Mapimpi 4, 70, De Klerk 66. Con: Pollard 66. Pen: Pollard 44, 48, 64.Yelow card: Mtawarira 10.Related: The weather forecast for the quarter-finals Power play: South Africa use the forwards to good effect (Getty Images) last_img read more

June 20

Episcopal churches to take Ash Wednesday services into the streets

first_img Rector Bath, NC February 21, 2012 at 1:42 pm The clergy of St. Matthew’s in Wilton, CT has been doing this for years . . . hanging out in Wilton Center and near the train station (commuter line into NYC). Many of our members commute into the city and aren’t back in town for our 11AM, 5PM or 7:30PM Ash Wednesday service. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR February 23, 2012 at 8:00 am Thank you for such a great idea. I read the comment about this being “gimmicky” but the people who stopped yesterday at our stop did not think it was anything like that. We have about 4200 temporary workers in our community working 10-12 hour shifts doing an upgrade at a plant. They do not know the area and some who stopped were so relieved to be able to participate in a practice that has deep meaning to them. I cannot even put into words what it has meant to me to have participated in this ministry. Rector Shreveport, LA scott murray says: February 20, 2012 at 6:12 am If you were truly “bringing spirit, belief, and belonging out from behind church doors, and into the places where we go every day”, your very presence would be an Ash Wednesday experience. “Ashes to Go?” You are Christ’s representative. Give them yourself as Jesus gave himself. Can we not be Christ to our world without gimmicky liturgical services? Live the forgiveness you want the world to experience. Rector Albany, NY Comments (9) Lent Sharon Klein says: Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ David Rickey says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET January 30, 2013 at 7:46 pm For decades I have been amazed at the long lines for ashes on Ash Wednesday. Clearly there is a desire for this act of penance. But I have never seen it translate into ongoing repentance or church involvement. To me it seems like an end in itself. “I got the Ashes on my forehead. I’m done.” Fr John Bunyan says: February 22, 2012 at 2:01 am What a great way of bringing the Church and its Gospel in touch with people and people in touch with the Church and of putting more meaning back into Ash Wednesday. I hope we’ll do this here in our hospital (here in Sydney, Australia) next Ash Wednesday and I hope to tell others of this fine example of outreach.Thank you. Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 22, 2014 at 6:03 pm St. Gabriel’s, St. James and St. David’s in Leesburg and Ashburn, VA are collaborating in order to cover a large range of public places in our communities to give ashes this year. We will be at the local Park and Ride depots, Loudoun hospital, outside Starbucks and Panera, outside supermarkets, and yes at the location where day laborers wait for work every day! Christ sent us out two X two (and then some). Loudoun County, VA is giving Ashes to Go!Alleluia (not Lent yet, I can still go there). Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Daniel Velez Rivera says: Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Canticle Communications] More than 40 Episcopal parishes in 11 states will take to the streets on Ash Wednesday, Feb. 22, marking the beginning of the holy season of Lent by giving “Ashes to Go.”In Chicago, St. Louis, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Baltimore, Newark, Erie, Austin and other cities and suburbs around the country, priests and lay people will visit train stations, subway stops, coffee shops, and street corners to mark the forehead of interested passers-by with the sign of the cross, and invite them to repent of their past wrongdoing and seek forgiveness and renewal.“Ashes to Go is about bringing spirit, belief, and belonging out from behind church doors, and into the places where we go every day,” said the Rev. Emily Mellott, rector of Calvary Episcopal Church, Lombard, Illinois, who is organizing the initiative in the Diocese of Chicago, where more than 20 churches are expected to participate. “It’s a simple event with deep meaning, drawing on centuries of tradition and worship to provide a contemporary moment of grace.”Mellott learned about Ashes to Go from the Rev. Teresa K. M. Danieley, of St. John’s Episcopal Church, St. Louis, Missouri, who began conducting a street corner service with the distribution of ashes in 2007.“On the street corner, we encounter people who have been hurt by previous experiences with organized religion and who, through Ashes to Go, take a tentative step back towards attending church,” Danieley says.Diocese of Chicago Bishop Jeff Lee is an enthusiastic supporter of marking Ash Wednesday in the streets. “My most memorable experience last year was with a woman who told me that she had left the church years ago,” he says. “She received the ashes and our prayers gratefully and then she looked up and with tears in her eyes, she said to me, ‘I just can’t believe you would bring the church out here to us.’“ Press Release Service Episcopal churches to take Ash Wednesday services into the streets Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Mike Losinger says: Rector Smithfield, NC February 21, 2012 at 11:02 am Gimmicky? Maybe. But such concrete and symbolic actions are the way that we communicate something larger than ourselves. I have serious doubt that we could be Christ to our world in a way identifiably so without liturgical services. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Joseph Frana says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 17, 2012 at 4:05 pm What a great idea! I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to participate this year, but if it is outside I just might be able to do it. Sharon Ely Pearson says: Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Jim NaughtonPosted Feb 16, 2012 Margaret Ayers says: February 21, 2012 at 5:51 pm My sadness in this is how many cannot imagine or see themselves in this ministry of presence; it seems like such a simple but generous act. I suspect our diminished sense of hospitality in God’s spirit is rearing its ugly head again. Thanks, Ash-people! Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

June 20

Searching for understanding one day after fatal church fire

first_img November 27, 2013 at 9:38 pm On behalf of the Vestry and congregation of St. Luke the Evangelist, Houston, we send our deepest sympathy to families of the victims and to our brothers and sisters in St. Paul’s By-the-Sea in Ocean City. May you feel the arms of Jesus holding you during these tough times. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs November 28, 2013 at 3:19 pm I pray for Rev. Dingwall, his widow and children and the community of Ocean City, that his soul may rest in peace and they may be healed in body, mind, soul and spirit. It is so difficult to fathom why this tragedy happened. Comments (18) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York November 27, 2013 at 5:23 pm What a shock to read this story. May everyone touched by this tragedy find meaning and healing in the Risen Christ. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID November 29, 2013 at 8:44 am Please know of the love and prayers coming from so many of us in the Diocese of Massachusetts. Al my love, prayers and hopes for a sense of God’s peace and the “sure and certain hope of resurrection.” John Barton says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev. Beth Grundy says: Dianne Aid, TSSF says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 27, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME November 27, 2013 at 2:42 pm So very sorry to read of this tragedy. Like the Phoenix, St. Paul’s will rise from the ashes, but the sadness will remain. We are never quite the same after such a seismic event. My prayers are with the people there. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Daniel Weatherholt says: Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Rev. Leslie Lewis says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Rev. Tally Bandy says: December 11, 2013 at 5:50 pm I was shocked and deeply saddened to hear of the death of David. He married my husband, Paul and I while he was the incumbent at St Andrew’s All Saints Church in Chase, BC. I remember him as a very hard working faith filled man with a terrific sense of humour. Our sincere condolences to his family and all those he loved and was loved by. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 27, 2013 at 5:39 pm It was with great sadness that I heard of the fire at St. Paul’s and the death of its Rector, Rev. David Dingwall. He was a graduate of the Anglican College of Emmanuel & St. Chad, Saskatoon, Canadawhere I was also trained. I send our love to his wife and family and the assurance that David will be remembered at our Advent Sunday Eucharist at St. James the Apostle, Regina, in the Diocese of Qu’Appelle, Canada.Fr. Derek & Margaret Nicholls November 30, 2013 at 12:16 pm On behalf of the College of Emmanuel and St. Chad, Saskatoon, SK, I send loving support to Brenda and the boys on the very tragic death of David. May you know the presence of God very specially in your life in the difficult days ahead Laurie Ljubojevic says: Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rev. Derek F. Nicholls says: November 29, 2013 at 12:03 pm I am saddened to hear of David’s passing. David was my tutor for four years while I studied theology to become a priest. He was also my pastor and deeply involved in the Shuswap community of B.C.My prayers are offered for the family of David and his parish family. He was so passionate about his journey here on earth. I shall remember him for his humour and hard work . Thankyou Lord. the Rev’d Francene Young says: The Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Michael LeCompte, Ocean City, MD says: November 27, 2013 at 10:21 pm My family has been coming to Ocean City since I was a child and we always worshiped at St. Paul’s-by-the-Sea if we were at the beach over a Sunday, and I have continued to do so each year into adulthood. The Dingwalls, Shirley Toms who is the organist, and others in the congregation remember us each year when we return and I have always been touched by their ministry of hospitality to vacationers and by their mission to the poor and marginalized. We visited Ocean City over Labor Day Weekend this past year and I had lunch with Father David and Brenda after the service and we had a great time discussing various topics including music and family life in the church since I am a PK and a church musician. Having worshiped here at least once or twice a year for close to 30 years, I have met several clergy at St. Paul’s and Father David was one of the best! My heart is sad because, even though we only met a few times, I feel that I have lost one of my priests and a friend. I have other friends in this community who are hurting (Brenda and the boys, Shirley, and others) and I would love nothing more than to be there to embrace all of them. I pray for this very special and loving community that they can find the strength to heal and carry on their important ministry of welcoming and hospitality that means so much to those of us who look forward to coming back each year. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Donna-Mae Siderius says: Featured Jobs & Calls the Rev Dr. Canon Beth Marie Murphy says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing November 27, 2013 at 11:31 pm As one of the first responders to arrive at this blazing church, we as firefighters encountered a shocking and tragic church event. We who handled the issues at the fire scene and witnessed death from inside this historic church, are asking our famlies and friends…….. why??? I was married in this beautiful church over 32 years ago and have been a volunteer firefighter/EMT for 35 years. But, this fire loss, injury and death, has really shocked me and so many of us; in this very close seaside community. After attending a touching and wonderful service this evening, I ask all of you to reach out to this family of severe loss and offer your support. Please continue to pray and support the lady church volunteer who is in critical condition, in a Baltimore Burn Center. She really needs our deep prayers for very speedy recovery! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 30, 2013 at 2:20 pm Several parishioners at my church, St John the Evangelist, in Salmon Arm, B.C. we’re shocked and saddened by this news of the Rev. David Dingwall’s death. They knew him personally because he had worked for several years as a priest in the Diocese of the Kootenay. He served as an:*Incumbent in Cranbrook, B.C.*Priest in three small towns: Sorrento, Chase, and Celista. (Whilst priest in Celesta he married Sarah and Mike Turgeon O’Brien.)In addition, The Rev David Dingwall’s father was Priest in Niagara, Ontario. The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Morris says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC November 27, 2013 at 7:07 pm Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. May the soul of David Dingwall and the souls of all the faithfully departed rest in peace. May all those who grieve find the consolation of their faith. November 27, 2013 at 8:07 pm Brenda and her sons worshiped at St. Johns in Hampton, VA. The boys sang in the childrens choir and took music lessons. We remember an especially poignant Advent service where Nick read a lesson. The news of the Rev. David Dimgwalls death is beyond sad. Our thoughts and prayers are with Brenda and the boys and the community. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET November 28, 2013 at 11:24 pm I am deeply saddened by this news. Such tragedies happen too often, and are impossible to really understand why. May we join in deepest sympathy and prayer especially for the widow and children, and close friends and parishioners of Fr. David Dingwall. And give thanks for the outpouring of love, support and grace from the Bishop Shand, the Lutherans and others there. November 27, 2013 at 9:57 pm David was a dearly-loved colleague in Kootenay Diocese, British Columbia. I grieve his death and send love to his wife and family. November 28, 2013 at 12:57 am So sorry to read this. My prayers go out to the whole community. Searching for understanding one day after fatal church fire ‘There will be resurrection experiences out of this,’ bishop says Rector Smithfield, NC Marcia Mary Cook says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Members of the Ocean City Fire Department carry a victim pulled from the fire building to an awaiting ambulance along Baltimore Avenue in Ocean City Tuesday morning. Photo: Grant L. Gursky[Episcopal News Service] Instead of celebrating a Thanksgiving Eve Eucharist on the morning of Nov. 27, the members of St. Paul’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church remained stunned after a fire at the church the morning before killed two people, including their rector.The Rev. David Dingwall, who would have turned 51 on Dec. 26, died hours after the fire occurred in the office area of the church at 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue in Ocean City, Maryland.The Rev. David Dingwall, who would have turned 51 on Dec. 26, died hours after the fire occurred in the office area of the church at 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue in Ocean City, Maryland.The fire began when a person on fire entered the church’s Shepherd’s Crook ministry offices, located in the 1923 rectory building that is part of the church’s property. Shepherd’s Crook provides food and clothing Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings.Diocese of Easton Bishop James “Bud” Shand told the Episcopal News Service in a telephone interview Nov. 27 that he had been told a person whose clothes were on fire ran in from the street to the church office. The Town of Ocean City in a press release issued midday on Nov. 27 identified the man as John Raymond Sterner, 56, of Ocean City.Sterner “embraced” a woman volunteer who was there preparing to open up for the Tuesday food distribution, Shand said. A man in the office “tried to kind of knock him down so he would roll and put him out but he couldn’t get near him because the heat was too intense.”The man who tried to stop Sterner was also burned, Shand said.Officials did not confirm those details in their release and did not identify the woman who is still being treated for burns or the other man. Sterner was declared dead at the scene. No other information about Sterner was released.Dingwall was in his office on the second floor when the fire broke out, according to Shand, and suffered smoke inhalation. The town said that Dingwall was found “during a primary search of the second floor of the building, where they experienced heavy smoke and heat conditions.”  The unconscious priest was quickly removed from the building, treated on the scene by paramedics and transported to Atlantic General Hospital, where he later died, the town said.While the exact cause of the fire is still under investigation, the press release said investigators suspect an accelerant was involved in the quick spread of the fire.“Initial damage assessments indicate significant fire damage of the first and second floor office, in addition to smoke and overhaul damage throughout the first floor of the rectory building,” the town said in its press release.Ocean City firefighters work to extinguish a blaze in the rectory of St. Paul’s by the Sea Tuesday morning. Grant L. GurskyA number of area Episcopal priests responded to news that St. Paul’s was on fire, Shand said. The priest from Church of the Holy Spirit, another Ocean City Episcopal church, came to the scene to minister to responders, according to the bishop, and others went to the hospital were the victims were taken. One of those priests anointed Dingwall that afternoon, Shand said.Shand, who came to the church after the fire, was in route from visiting one burn victim at another hospital to Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin, Maryland, to see Dingwall again when he received word that the priest had died.The parish is “shocked” and “reeling” the day after the fire, the bishop said. The junior warden was meeting with the church’s insurance company this morning to discover the extent of the damage. The town said the church had “minimal to no significant damage.” News reports said the sanctuary was intact but had suffered smoke damage.“We don’t know what goes through people’s minds, why people do what they do and why they inflict pain and hurt on other people like they do. Why did that man do that? I don’t know,” Shand said. “But we have to live with the good and the bad, the dark and the light … there will be resurrection experiences out of this. It might be hard, but we will move on. This congregation will become more resilient as time goes on.”St. Paul’s By-the-Sea in Ocean City, Maryland, before the blaze.The Gothic Revival wood-shingled St. Paul’s Church dates from 1900 but, Episcopal services began in Ocean City in 1878, just three years after the first hotel opened on the island, according to a history on the church’s website.The building where the fire occurred also houses the Red Doors Community Center, a St. Paul’s ministry.“We mourn the loss of our rector and priest, Father David Dingwall, and pray also for everyone affected,” including the other unidentified victims, one who died and one who suffered life-threatening injuries, the community center said on its Facebook page.The town said the community center experienced “minimal to no significant damage.”Much of Ocean City was mourning as well. St. Paul’s parishioners, as well as other members of the Ocean City community, will gather for a prayer service at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church on the evening of Nov. 27. Shand said he and the Rev. Heather Crook, the canon to the ordinary, will be at that service “to be there for the folks of St. Paul’s-by-the-Sea.”Amy Morgan, St. Peter’s office manager, told Episcopal News Service in a telephone interview that one of the Lutheran church’s parishioners was a first responder to the scene and was “pretty shaken up by it all.” Out of her conversation with that woman, Morgan said, came the idea from her and Pastor Gregg Knepp for St. Peter’s to offer to host a prayer service for St. Paul’s members and “for the community just to come out a show our support.”Morgan contacted the Rev. Penelope Morrow, St. Paul’s deacon, to see if the parish would want to have such a service, and she said she also called Cook. “We didn’t want to be intrusive; we didn’t want to step on any toes. We just wanted to show our love and support,” she said.The service will include a “love offering” to be given to the diocese for use at St. Paul’s, Morgan said.Morgan said the hours after the fire have been “surreal” because, while one hears on the news about “bizarre” things like this happening elsewhere, “you never think it’s going to happen here.”“It made me go home and hug my daughter tight,” said Morgan, who often had to pause to compose herself during the interview.Ocean City is popular resort town located at the southern tip of Fenwick Island, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland that stretches north along Delaware. It has a year-round population of about 7,100 people, but swells to more than 300,000 in the summer. The town is “tight-knit,” Morgan said, and area churches often come together to serve community needs.“When there’s a need, you really see the heart of this community come out,” she said. “That’s why I love this place.”Ocean City Fire Chief Chris Larmore called Nov. 26 “a very tragic day for our community.”“We are thankful for the numerous agencies that assisted us during our response and especially thankful for all of the public safety personnel who helped prevent this fire from claiming more lives,” he said in the town’s press release.St. Peter’s Lutheran Church and many other area churches have offered their worship space to St. Paul’s, Shand said, and near-by St. Mary Star of the Sea-Holy Savior Roman Catholic Church offered to host the priest’s funeral. That service will probably occur sometime early next week, the bishop said, depending on when law enforcement officials release of Dingwall’s body.Staff at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of Maryland in Baltimore are conducting autopsies “to determine the manner and cause” of Dingwall’s and Sterner’s death, the town said in its release.Shand said the entire Episcopal Church and other denominations have been “very generous” in their offers of help and prayers.Dingwall moved to the Eastern Shore of Maryland in 2003 after serving three parishes in the Canadian province of British Columbia where he grew up. He was received into the Episcopal Church from the Anglican Church of Canada in 2005, according to his biography on the church’s website. “He is particularly thankful for this time as the people of the parish provided him with a gracious introduction to life in The Diocese of Easton, The Episcopal Church and, perhaps most importantly, to life on the Eastern Shore,” the biography says.Dingwall is survived by his wife Brenda, their three sons and their dog Minnie. Their children all live in the area, according to Shand.“Everyone is in shock. Everyone is devastated for his family,” Amanda Cropper, a vestry member who’s in charge of the church’s building and grounds, told the Associated Press. “He was a strong advocate for those who are not lucky in life.”She added: “He’ll be greatly missed, but for me it will be on the more personal side. … He had a devastatingly wicked sense of humor.”The congregation was “devoted” to Dingwall and his leadership, the bishop said, and the priest “reached out to the community in big ways.”“David brought home to them the commands of our Lord” to feed the hungry, to give shelter to those who need it and give clothing and water to those going without.St. Paul’s had a “tremendous ministry to the misplaced, the displaced people of Ocean City and there’s a lot of them,” Shand said.For years, the parish has served a Christmas Day dinner and last year’s meal hosted between 600-700 dinners with about a 1,000 meals served take-away style, according to Shand.The fire, especially coming just two days before Thanksgiving, “will leave an indelible mark in the minds of Ocean City, St. Paul’s” the bishop said.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA November 27, 2013 at 9:52 pm The Sisters of St. Mary, Sewanee, TN are joining me in praying for the repose of those souls, and for Our Lord’s healing grace enfolding the hurting spirits of St. Paul’s parish and Ocean City. We pray also for Bp, Shand and Canon Cook as they minister to this suffering community. Linda Fortier says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group June Cridland says: Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

June 20

West Africa clergy issue Ebola challenge to global Anglicans

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Health & Healthcare Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL West Africa clergy issue Ebola challenge to global Anglicans Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA By ACNS staffPosted Oct 8, 2014 Featured Events Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Anglican Communion, Africa, Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Primate and Bishop of Kumasi Dr Daniel Sarfo’s clergy have determined that shaking hands during sharing the Peace will no longer be permitted to stop the spread of Ebola. Photo: The Church of the Province of West Africa[Anglican Communion News Service] Clergy in West Africa have challenged Anglicans worldwide to “live as their brothers’ keepers” and act to address the Ebola crisis.The priests of the Anglican Diocese of Kumasi, Ghana, issued their challenge after a workshop entitled Church and Community Response to Ebola in which they learned more about the disease and how to prevent its spread.In a statement issued after the workshop Message to the International Community, they said, “We challenge the international community to live as their brothers’ keepers*. We encourage Anglican Churches or Christian Churches the world over to express their solidarity by observing one Sunday as Ebola Sunday to pray and mobilize resources for the affected areas in the sub-region or West Africa.”“They should encourage their governments to send resources especially the found drug to the affected areas by way of advocacy.”The clergy did not hold back as they called on the United Nations to provide material and equipment to countries affected by the virus. They also called for international community to collaborate to stop conflict in countries in Africa and the Middle East “instead of waiting for lives and property to be destroyed before the come in with aid”.No more shaking handsThe workshop training carried out at St Cyprian’s Anglican Cathedral, Kumasi, was led by Dr Irene des Bordes. It prompted the clergy to announce they would cease embracing and shaking hands during the Peace at church services; would only perform Holy Communion by intinction; would wear gloves, socks and shoes when visiting the dead or those in hospital; and would wash their hands using running water and hand sanitizers.Several provincial Churches of the Anglican Communion including in Nigeria have announced similar precautions in hope that they can stop the spread of this disease that has, to date, killed 3,439 people and infected 7,494. Experts say it could infect up to 1.5m people by January of next year.Ebola at war against humanityThe Primate of the Church of the Province of West Africa, the Most Rev. Daniel Sarfo, also issued a statement welcoming the UN UN Mission on Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER).He expressed his gratitude to its staff and also other agencies including the Anglican agency Us for their contribution to tackling the crisis in region. He said, “Now Ebola is at war against humanity, the world must act now to stop Ebola.”The full statement can be found below.THE PRIMATE OF THE CHURCH OF THE PROVINCE OF WEST AFRICA WELCOMES UN MISSION ON EBOLA EMERGENCY RESPONSEOn behalf of the President, the people and the Church of the Province of West Africa (Anglican Communion), I welcome the UN Mission on Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER) led by Mr. Anthony Banbury to Accra, Ghana to begin a mission to contain the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa. We consider the UN mission as timely and we are very grateful.The Advance Party of United Nations Mission on Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER) has arrived in Accra in Ghana, which will be used as the base for the Mission. It will be made up of 250 personnel – 100 will be based in Accra and 150 for the affected Countries.Their mandate is five-fold – “stopping the outbreak; treating the infected; ensuring essential services; preserving stability; and preventing further outbreak. It is our prayers that we all support them to make the mission’s work a great success.We express our profound appreciation to the UN, WHO, Organizations and Bodies like the Bill Gate Foundation for coming to our Aid, not forgetting those working with the Anglican Church such as Us (USPG) , UK Government through DFID and those who are about to join. We also encourage Anglican Churches or Christian Churches the world over to express their solidarity by observing one Sunday as Ebola Sunday to pray and mobilize resources for the affected areas in the sub-region or West Africa.Now Ebola is at war against humanity, the world must act now to stop Ebola.With every blessing++Daniel, CPWAArchbishop Daniel Yinkah SarfoENDSNotes*From Genesis 4:10 ‘Then the LORD said to Cain, “Where is Abel your brother?” And he said, “I do not know. Am I my brother’s keeper?”‘ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

June 20

Ecuador Litoral sigue respondiendo a las necesidades de las víctimas…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Por Lynette Wilson Posted May 12, 2016 Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC [Episcopal News Service] El sábado 14 de mayo se cumplen cuatro semanas de que un terremoto de 7,8 de magnitud azotó Ecuador, para dejar un saldo de 650 muertos, más de 4.600 lesionados y unos 30.000 desplazados. La recuperación por las pérdidas de vidas y los daños, que se calculan entre $2.000 y $3.000, tomará años.A lo largo del último mes, la Diócesis Episcopal del Litoral, que atiende la zona costera más afectada, llevó a cabo una encuesta de las comunidades en torno a sus iglesias en las áreas que habían sufrido el mayor impacto, y ha desarrollado un plan integral para atender las necesidades a corto y largo plazo de personas que viven en esas comunidades; tarea para la que ha nombrado a algunos feligreses como enlaces con los funcionarios locales del gobierno.La diócesis se prepara para ofrecer un “apoyo efectivo y eficiente” a las víctimas a partir de los resultados de la encuesta, dijo el Rvdmo. Alfredo Morante España, obispo de [Ecuador] Litoral, en un mensaje por email. Apoyo, añadió él, que exigirá importantes recursos económicos a lo largo de los próximos dos o tres años.El plan de la diócesis abarca cuatro líneas de acción: proporcionar alimento, salud y atención médica, atención espiritual y reconstrucción y mejora de viviendas.En Manta, una comunidad de la zona costera central a unas tres horas y media por carretera al norte de Guayaquil, donde la diócesis tiene su sede, cuatro iglesias, algunas de las cuales con importantes daños, han abiertos sus puertas a feligreses y otros miembros [damnificados] de la comunidad. Un diácono recientemente ordenado compartió su experiencia personal de pérdida en una entrevista para la sección noticias de Episcopal News Service, que aparece regularmente en español.Inmediatamente después del terremoto del 16 de mayo, la diócesis recibió el apoyo de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo que le ha permitido proporcionar alimento, ropa, primeros auxilios, agua potable, artículos de uso doméstico y ayuda para reparaciones de emergencia a 300 familias.La Iglesia Episcopal tiene dos diócesis en Ecuador: Litoral, que cubre la región costera más afectada [por el sismo], y la Diócesis de Ecuador Central con sede en Quito, capital del país, donde se sintieron temblores del terremoto del 16 de abril. Aunque en la capital no se registraron daños, una comunidad perteneciente  a la Diócesis de Ecuador Central sí sufrió daños y también ha sido socorrida por la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo.Durante una llamada telefónica semanal para discutir las necesidades de las víctimas del terremoto, los participantes de la Diócesis Litoral dijeron que muchas de las personas a las que sirven viven en comunidades a las cuales no llegaron inmediatamente la ayuda y los socorros del gobierno nacional.Además del apoyo de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, la diócesis ha recibido apoyo de episcopales individuales, así como de iglesias y diócesis, incluidas las de Puerto Rico, Nueva Jersey y Tennessee, entre otras. En las próximas semanas, la Diócesis de Puerto Rico, que dirige un sistema hospitalario, enviará un equipo médico a Manta; y un pequeño grupo en representación de cuatro iglesias de la Diócesis de Tennessee hará una visita previamente programada a principios de junio, [durante la cual] estará unos pocos días en Guayaquil antes de dirigirse a Manta en el norte.“Estamos asombrados y entristecidos por la destrucción causada por el reciente terremoto en Ecuador”, dijo George Kurz, miembro de la iglesia episcopal de San Felipe [St. Philip] en Donelson, Tennessee, un suburbio de Nashville, y copresidente del Comité  para la Continuación de la Obra en la Diócesis del Litoral.“Algunas de nuestras iglesias han tenido relaciones de compañerismo con iglesias en la zona más afectada de Manta durante 10 o 15 años”, dijo él, haciendo notar que apenas un par de horas antes del terremoto del 16 de mayo, San Felipe ofreció una cena de espagueti y una subasta silente para recaudar fondos para los miembros de un centro de salud que habría de empezar a funcionar en Ecuador en junio.“Al enterarnos del número de damnificados y de que había 30.000 personas que se habían quedado sin hogar, nos dimos cuenta de que nuestras clínicas resultarían inadecuadas para esas graves necesidades”, apuntó, añadiendo que su grupo también debatió el cancelar el viaje y enviar el dinero para socorros en lugar de imponerle una carga adicional a la diócesis.“Sin embargo, cuando consultamos con el obispo Morante, nos pidió que viniéramos para estar con nuestros amigos por [motivos de] compañerismo y apoyo espiritual durante este tiempo de crisis”, dijo Kurz.El obispo estuvo de acuerdo con el grupo de Kurz en que las clínicas no serían prácticas este año, y en lugar de viajar con un grupo grande, 11 personas en representación de cuatro iglesias episcopales harán el viaje y ofrecerán dos talleres  centrados en “el espíritu de servicio” hacia los vecinos en un tiempo de necesidad.“Si bien tenemos proyectos de servicio cada año, hemos encontrado que una vez que lleguemos a Ecuador lo más importante ha de ser abrirse  a la dirección del Espíritu Santo e intentar responder como mejor podamos”, afirmó.Los que deseen hacer donaciones pueden dirigirse al fondo para desastres de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Latin America, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Province IX Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ecuador Litoral sigue respondiendo a las necesidades de las víctimas del terremotolast_img read more

June 20

La conferencia Proyecto de Historia de las Mujeres Episcopales se…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Por M. Dion ThompsonPosted Jun 14, 2017 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Sandra T. Montes, a la derecha, consultora de la Fundación de la Iglesia Episcopal, se toma una autofoto con la Rda.. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización, la reconciliación y la creación, al centro, y Denise Treviño-Gómez, misionera para el desarrollo intercultural en la Diócesis de Texas, durante la conferencia Proyecto de Historia de las Mujeres Episcopales que tiene lugar en el Centro Marítimo en Maryland. Foto de Sandra T. Montes vía Facebook.[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] La Rvdma. Jennifer L. Baskerville-Burrows profundizó en su sermón, invocando rítmicamente los nombres de una gran nube de testigos cuya presencia era hondamente sentida por los que se reunieron cerca de Baltimore esta semana para la conferencia Proyecto de Historia de las Mujeres Episcopales.“Ustedes las conocen, mujeres como Pauli Murray; ¡digan su nombre!  Verna Dozier; ¡digan su nombre!  Margaret Bush, primera mujer negra en servir en la Cámara de diputados; ¡digan su nombre!”, dijo Baskerville-Burrows, la recién electa obispa de Indianápolis y la primera obispa diocesana negra elegida en la Iglesia Episcopal.. “¡Pronúncienlos! ¿Quién más? ¡Digan su nombre! La Rda. Carmen Guerrero; ¡digan su nombre! Digámosle estos nombres a nuestros hijos, de manera que sepan quienes son”.La conferencia, del 12 al 15 de junio, la primera en la historia del grupo que se centra en las mujeres de color, reunió a mujeres laicas y ordenadas de todo el país. Araceli Ma, que trabaja con el ministerio latino en la Diócesis de Washington, dijo que ella vino para garantizar una presencia latina en la conferencia y para mostrarles a sus dos hijas, de 13 y 10 años de edad, las oportunidades abiertas para ellas.Durante el tiempo que pasaron juntas, las mujeres compartieron historias de sus propias esperanzas y dificultades, encontrando con frecuencia un abrumador sentido de conexión en sus experiencias particulares.“Mi historia es nuestra historia”, dijo Baskerville-Burrows durante su homilía del 12 de junio.La Rda. Matilda Dunn, presidente del Proyecto de Historia, dijo que la planificación de la conferencia de este año comenzó hace aproximadamente dos años. El proyecto había estado recogiendo historias y relatos orales de mujeres a través de la Iglesia Episcopal, desde las famosas hasta las leales feligresas y miembros de la sociedad del altar que a menudo forman la columna principal de una parroquia.“Debemos honrarlas porque ellas también están haciendo el trabajo de la Iglesia”, afirmó [Dunn]. “Es importante para mí porque la historia ha de preservarse para todos nosotros, hombres y mujeres”.Sin embargo, Dunn y otras personas sintieron la necesidad de reservar algún tiempo para las mujeres de color, a fin de honrar y celebrar su historia colectiva. Mediante la Rda. Nan Peete, consiguieron a Baskerville-Burrows como predicadora y a la Rda. Kelly Brown Douglas, recién nombrada decana de la Escuela Episcopal de Teología, como oradora principal. La conferencia se inició el lunes, el día en que la Rvdma. Barbara C. Harris, la primera mujer ordenada obispa en la Comunión Anglicana, cumplía 87 años.En la mañana del 13 de junio, Douglas instó a los que asistían a la conferencia a decir la verdad acerca de sus experiencias y de cómo sus vidas habían configurado su visión del mundo.“Tenemos que decir la verdad respecto a quienes somos. A este país no le gusta contar la verdad sobre sí mismo”, señaló ella. “Ahora bien, si la Iglesia Episcopal cuenta la verdad sobre sí misma, lo que es, eso será como contar la verdad sobre esta nación”.Durante su discurso, ella citó recientes estadísticas del censo para ofrecer un vistazo de las luchas y retos a que se enfrentaron muchas mujeres y, en particular, mujeres de color. Alrededor del 25 por ciento de todas las mujeres negras e hispanas viven en la pobreza, y esa cifra asciende al 28 por ciento para las mujeres nativoamericanas. En consecuencia, los niños también sufren. Los índices de pobreza oscilan entre el 13 por ciento de los niños asiáticos al 36 por ciento de los niños afroamericanos, dijo Douglas.Las cifras de la justicia criminal son igualmente desalentadoras con índices de encarcelamiento para mujeres negras e hispanas que exceden los porcentajes de población.“Dados estos hechos, ¿qué significa todo esto para nosotras que estamos reunidas aquí?, dijo Douglas. “Somos llamadas a mostrar lo que significa ser la Iglesia. Somos llamadas a recordar [a Jesús] actuando y obrando de la manera  que él lo haría en el mundo”.Para Douglas,, el encuentro de Jesús con la mujer samaritana, tal como lo cuenta el evangelio de Juan, fue un ejemplo perfecto de cómo uno cruza las barreras sociales, echa a un lado el privilegio social y encuentra verdadera y genuina comunión. Ella les recordó que incluso aunque sus vidas hayan transcurrido dentro del mundo de la Iglesia Episcopal, con frecuencia seguían siendo ajenas con una perspectiva singular. También instó [a sus oyentes] a encontrar un terreno común con los mujeres que no estaban en el centro de conferencias, donde las bandejas de dulces y las jarras de café llenaban las mesas a la salida del salón climatizado.“Las mujeres samaritanas de nuestro tiempo son las mujeres que se parecen a nosotras”, dijo ella. “Es a esas mujeres a las que debemos responder”.Durante una sesión de preguntas y respuestas que siguió al discurso principal, Grecia Adriana Rivas, que vive cerca de San Diego, California, habló del temor y la ansiedad incontrolados en las comunidades de inmigrantes e indocumentados en los últimos meses. Los agentes de Inmigración y Aduanas de EE.UU. (ICE por su sigla en inglés) han sido vistos patrullando la feria del condado o vigilando las iglesias, apuntó ella.“Estaba tan furiosa”, dijo ella. “Ya ni siquiera podemos divertirnos.  Ya ni podemos practicar nuestra fe”.Douglas respondió con un repetido llamado a la solidaridad.“Debemos hacer acto de presencia cuando es nuestra causa y cuando no es nuestra causa porque es nuestra causa”, afirmó. “Debemos estar allí los unos por los otros”.A través de la conferencia, las mujeres dedicaron tiempo a cuestionar el significado de diversidad, los aspectos prácticos de ser una iglesia de acogida, y las historias culturales que cada uno aporta a la Iglesia. Durante el culto, cuando fueron invitadas a rezar el Padre Nuestro en el idioma de sus corazones, las palabras familiares pudieron escucharse en inglés, español y navajo.La Rda. Cornelia Eaton, diácona que sirve en la Diócesis de Navajolandia, mencionó la dolorosa historia de Fort Sumner, Nuevo México, donde en la década del 60 del siglo XIX, el gobierno de EE.UU. mudó a la fuerza a miles de navajos sacados de sus tierras para vivir en condiciones miserables en el Bosque Redondo. El empeño de relocalización fracasó y al cabo de unos años, los navajos fueron devueltos a sus hogares. Pero la historia perdura y el fuerte y sus contornos son recordados como “el lugar del sufrimiento”, dijo Eaton.“Todas somos tejedoras de muchas culturas y tradiciones”, dijo ella. “Yo me convertí en una tejedora de la tradición cristiana y la tradición navaja”.Algunos de los relatos compartidos conllevaron singulares encuentros que tenían eco entre las asistentes y provocaron risas en el salón. Sandra Montes, que es afroperuana y proviene de la Diócesis de Texas, contó la ocasión en que ella y su madre estaban comprando tarjetas de felicitación en Boston, Massachusetts. Montes dijo que mientras estaban riéndose y leyendo las tarjetas, dos mujeres mayores blancas se dirigieron a ellas y les dijeron: “las tarjetas mexicanas están allá”. Montes  contó que ella y su madre se quedaron mirando a las mujeres y les dijeron: “pero nosotras somos peruanas”.La Rda. Yein Esther Kim, proveniente de la Escuela de Teología Episcopal donde fue ordenada en 2014 y quien ahora sirve en la Diócesis de Los Ángeles, compartió que “hacer acto de presencia” puede tener un matiz particular para una mujer de color.“Cuando perciben que [un evento] no es suficientemente diverso o lo bastante multicultural, me invitarán, como si yo pudiera aportarles un poco de diversidad”, dijo Kim, que es coreana-americana. Luego, yo voy, porque nada sucederá si no me aparezco”.En verdad, el valor de presentarse, de ser vistas y de aportar su voz a la conversación cultural, ya sea en marchas, en redes sociales o en la vida de la Iglesia Episcopal, no pasó inadvertido para las mujeres.”Dios es fiel—seámoslo también nosotras”, dijo Baskerville-Burrows durante su homilía de apertura. “Las mujeres de color no seremos borradas. No nos harán invisibles. Aprendamos a vernos como Jesús nos ve. Porque Dios nos dice a todas nosotras, a todas las mujeres de color en la Iglesia, “yo TE veo”.— El Rdo. M. Dion Thompson es sacerdote de la Diócesis de Maryland. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Ethnic Ministries Rector Belleville, IL La conferencia Proyecto de Historia de las Mujeres Episcopales se centra en las mujeres de color Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

June 20

Anglican primates offer prayers for Las Vegas as Episcopal leaders…

first_img Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Catherine Cheek says: Bishops United Against Gun Violence issued a full statement on the massacre in the afternoon, offering not only prayers but also a call to political action on the issue of gun violence.“It is entirely reasonable in the wake of mass killings perpetrated by murderers with assault weapons to ask lawmakers to remove such weapons from civilian hands. It is imperative to ask why, as early as this very week, Congress is likely to pass a bill making it easier to buy silencers,” the statement says, noting that silencers make it more difficult for law enforcement officials to detect gunfire as shootings are unfolding.Jennings, the House of Deputies president, echoed that call to political action based on the Episcopal Church’s values.“In 2015, General Convention passed resolution C005, titled ‘Implement Laws to Decrease Gun Violence,’ which includes a call to ban the sale of assault weapons to civilians,” she said. “May we have the strength to put our words into actions so that the lawmakers who represent us in Washington, D.C., and in state capitols across the land will enact sensible legislation that can prevent guns from falling into the hands of people whose hearts are torn with hatred, violence, and despair.”Some members of Bishops United spoke with Edwards in the morning by conference call, offering their support.“We assured him of our prayers and then we offered him any assistance that we as bishops could provide to him or the diocese of Nevada as they attend pastorally or otherwise to the victims of this massacre,” said Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, one of the Bishops United conveners.Douglas helped form Bishops United Against Gun Violence after the 2012 massacre of 20 students and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. The group now totals more than 70 bishops, who have pushed for gun reform legislation to help prevent future mass shootings.The bishops’ statement on the Las Vegas said that, as clichéd as it has become, Christians must offer “thoughts and payers.” They must pray for all who have been touched by the Las Vegas massacre and “by our country’s cripplingly frequent outbursts of lethal gun violence.”“We must look into our own hearts and examine the ways in which we are culpable or complicit in the gun violence that surrounds us every day,” the bishops wrote.They also said that Christians must act and “engage in the debates that shape how Americans live and die, especially when they die due to violence or neglect.” However, Christians must understand that a comprehensive solution to gun violence “will not simply be a matter of changing laws, but of changing lives.”“Our country is feasting on anger that fuels rage, alienation and loneliness. From the White House to the halls of Congress to our own towns and perhaps at our own tables, we nurse grudges and resentments rather than cultivating the respect, concern and affection that each of us owes to the other,” the bishops said. “The leaders who should be speaking to us of reconciliation and the justice that must precede it too often instead stoke flames of division and mistrust. We must, as a nation, embrace prayerful resistance before our worse impulses consume us.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the Episcopal Church’s House of Deputies, also issued a statement in reaction to the deadly violence.“This morning, my heart broke once again to learn about another mass shooting in the United States,” she said in part, offering her prayers for the people of the Episcopal Diocese of Nevada, with their deputies, and Bishop Dan Edwards.The Roman Catholic Guardian Angel Cathedral is scheduled to host a prayer service for victims and their families at 5 p.m. Oct. 2, and the Episcopal Diocese of Nevada will hold a service at 7 p.m. Oct. 3 at Christ Church, the Episcopal church closest to the Las Vegas strip where the shooting happened.Edwards, who will preach at the Oct. 3 service, told Episcopal News Service by phone that his office reached out to the chaplain at Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center to offer Episcopal clergy members to supplement the hospital’s own pastoral care. The diocese offered the same to the Las Vegas Metro Police Department and other first responders. Edwards did not yet have information on how many Episcopal priests and deacons had volunteered.And with authorities saying blood supplies are running low in the massacre’s aftermath, the Diocese of Nevada plans to include a call for blood donations in its communications to Episcopalians in the state.“It’s heartbreaking for the victims and all those affected by this particular tragedy,” Edwards said. “It’s also heartbreaking for our society, that this keeps happening.”News of the massacre developed overnight Oct. 1, and by morning it was clear the shooting at an outdoor country music concert was the deadliest in modern U.S. history. Authorities said the gunman fired down on the crowd from a room on the 32nd floor of nearby Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, sending concertgoers fleeing.As of midday Oct. 2, the death toll was at 58, with more than 500 estimated injured. The gunman, identified as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, later was found dead in the room, apparently after killing himself. Authorities also said he was found with more than 19 rifles.Bishops United Against Gun Violence is calling on churches everywhere to toll their bells Oct. 3 at the same time, 9 a.m. PT (noon ET) in solidarity. The number of bell tolls will mirror the number of dead reported at that time.Edwards, a member of Bishops United, said there are no simple reasons that the United States continues to see so many mass shootings, though he added there is a compelling case for looking toward the availability of assault weapons and the ability to possess them in numbers beyond what would be needed for legitimate personal use.He also pointed to the social problems of loneliness, isolation and disconnection, factors that he said are all too common in Nevada.“It’s not the guns alone. It’s the veneration of violence in our society,” Edwards said. “Our societal embrace of violence as a response to any form of unhappiness is a very serious spiritual concern. The churches have the primary responsibility for converting America away from the veneration of violence back to the prince of peace.”It was too early to say whether members of local Episcopal congregations were among the victims or their families, though Edwards said an Episcopal priest’s son was one of the police officers who responded to the scene. The priest stayed up into the early morning until hearing that his son was OK.The Rev. Barry Vaughn, rector at Christ Church, has not yet heard of anyone else in his congregation affected by the massacre, but a message on the church Facebook page invited parishioners to call or stop by if they need to talk to someone.“I think everyone is just stunned by it right now,” Vaughn told Episcopal News Service. “The best thing that we can do is to reach out and love people who are affected by it. This sort of thing, it’s like a natural disaster. It can’t be predicted.“It comes out of nowhere, although it doesn’t exactly come out of nowhere,” Vaughn said, echoing Edwards’ concern about the prevalence of guns in American society.Reaction and condolences have been pouring in from all corners of the church, from the primates meeting underway in Canterbury to former Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who previously served as the bishop of the Diocese of Nevada.“Prayers are ascending for all in the midst of this carnage at Mandalay Bay,” she said in an emailed statement. “When, oh when, will we begin to limit the availability of weapons of mass destruction and death?“May the souls of all the departed rest in peace, may the injured find healing, may all the responders find courage and strength, and may all of us know that God is to be found even in the midst of this evil.”Also on Oct. 2, Curry prayed during Evensong at Canterbury Cathedral: “We come to you tonight, Lord, with sorrow in our hearts for 58 of your children are no longer with us. And some 500 of your children are hurting physically and emotionally. And, one of your children took their life. They are all our sisters. They are all our brothers. They’re all your children.” Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 FBI agents ride an armored vehicle to a staging area on Oct. 2 after a mass shooting during a music festival on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada. Photo: Las Vegas Sun via Reuters[Episcopal News Service] Leaders of the Anglican Communion called the weekend massacre in Las Vegas “truly shocking” in a statement released from Canterbury, England, by Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, as faith leaders mobilize outreach efforts in the wake of the shooting, which killed at least 58 and injured hundreds more.Clergy members in the Las Vegas area are providing pastoral care for victims and emergency personnel, memorial worship services are planned for this week, and a group of Episcopal bishops is organizing a nationwide effort to toll church bells Oct. 3 in memory of the dead.“We are praying for the families and friends of those who have died and for the many people who have been wounded,” Curry said Oct. 2 in a video delivering the statement released by the primates, who are gathered in Canterbury. “We remember, too, everyone else caught up in this tragedy – including the emergency services (first responders). We pray that the peace of the Lord Jesus Christ will be with the people of Las Vegas as they endure this trauma.” Gun Violence, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Primates Meeting 2017 Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Primates Meeting, Tags Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ October 5, 2017 at 8:11 am The episcopal church opposes gun violence but it has no moral authority because it pro-actively promotes and encourages children and young people to reject Holy Scripture and practice sexual immorality and debauchery. The purpose and mission of the episcopal church is to publicly advocate sexual gratification and rebellion against God. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group 2:40 1:59 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anglican primates offer prayers for Las Vegas as Episcopal leaders mobilize after massacre An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ben Quinten says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Las Vegas shooting, Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (3) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Bishops United Against Gun Violence, October 12, 2017 at 7:07 am Ben Q – why are you so angry? This is so obviously not true that it cries out for help. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Submit a Press Release October 2, 2017 at 8:57 pm Thank you, and God’s peace and blessings for us all. Pray, and then pray, and then pray even more. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By David PaulsenPosted Oct 2, 2017 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Jessie jeffress says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

June 20

Small, rural Episcopal churches designed by world-renowned architect are disappearing

first_imgSmall, rural Episcopal churches designed by world-renowned architect are disappearing Residents of one South Dakota town are trying to preserve their Upjohn treasure STANLEY ZIMMERMAN says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET March 20, 2018 at 6:48 pm Am I remembering correctly that this is also known as Carpenter Gothic ( to distinguish it from stone bldgs.) ? Many small towns have church bldgs made from such pre-planned drawings. The4re is a small building in CNY which a local man designed after the example of St Paul’s chapel, NYC. His family had worshipped there prior to relocatingto Upstate NY Ron Caldwell says: Comments are closed. Les Singleton says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY March 22, 2018 at 10:31 am St. John’s Episcopal Church in Youngstown New York is an Upjohn Carpenter Gothic building. It was built from a kit in 1878. It continues in use today. Willis H A Moore says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Matthew Craig says: Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET March 21, 2018 at 6:28 pm I first read this article this article because it mentioned Groton. Coincidences galore. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Tombstone, AZ, was founded by the Reverend Endicott Peabody, who built the only Upjohn Gothic Revival church made of adobe. “The Rector ” returned to Massachusetts to complete his studies and found Groton School. Services are held each Sunday in the 135 year old building, the home of the oldest Protestant church in Arizona territory that still worships in its original building. Submit a Press Release March 20, 2018 at 6:28 pm Upjohn designed the first Episcopal church in Plymouth, Mass. in 1844.and a gothic home for its first Rector, which became the Rectory for the second building of 1914. The lumber of the first building became a four-square Colonial on that Russell St. site. The second church building being built on Court St. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Amy SowderPosted Mar 20, 2018 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 25, 2018 at 10:48 pm Architecture is one thing, but the building is ultimately unimportant. The congregational life that takes place in that building is what’s important, and the real tragedy here is not the loss of buildings, but of the congregations housed within them. Why have so many of these rural churches closed? What are The Episcopal Church and the individual dioceses doing to support rural and small town ministry and to prevent such future church closures? AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Carol Roselli says: March 20, 2018 at 7:04 pm This reference to Upjohn is indeed interesting. Churches in Eastern Oregon celebrate the work of the Rev Dr Ruben Denton Nevius, whose architectural genius created church buildings which are still in use in this diocese. Nevius’ Ascension Church in Cove, Oregon, has become part of Diocesan Headquarters. Comments (13) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska March 20, 2018 at 6:36 pm St. Agatha’s Church in De Funiak Springs, Florida, was built in about 1886, and its sister church down the road in Milton, Florida, St. Mary’s, look as though they could well have been Upjohn churches. The history on these is a bit dim, however.St. Agatha’s–in fact the original part of the town of De Funiak Springs–is the largest historical area granted that honor in the country to date. Judy Hoover says: Rector Smithfield, NC March 21, 2018 at 10:03 am Wow . . .One out of 153 still there. Great story. Regarding reed pump organ, there is a societyabout these organs. Google Reed Organ Society. Scroll down to convention in Moline, Illinois,and listen to the music being played. This writer had one for many years, another story. Thatbeautiful little church needs to be preserved, and what a great wedding chapel it could be.Thanks for running this great story. March 20, 2018 at 9:19 pm That’s a beautiful little church, surely there is room in the national budget to pay for its restoration and preservation. Maybe something like what was done to Sequoyah’s home could be commissioned. A larger structure was built over his home to preserve it and protect it from violent weather. March 21, 2018 at 10:12 am I grew up spending summers near Leetown, West Virginia, where there is a little Episcopal church, St. Bartholomews, that looks exactly like this one. And it’s still in use. joe pennington says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI R H Lewis VTS1963 says: Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Featured Events March 20, 2018 at 5:59 pm UPJOHN’S RURAL ARCHITECTURE also found good usage in numerous small towns and villages across the South. In Alabama 7 Upjohn churches were built in the 1850’s and 5 are still standing, in good condition. The finest example is St. Luke’s of Jacksonville AL which was built close to the “church” plan and has been beautifully preserved if altered slightly. Thank God, the winds of yesterday’s violent storms in Jacksonville spared it. It is an irreplaceable treasure. Rector Belleville, IL March 21, 2018 at 7:22 am There is still one of these churches at Annandale, MN. It is not open during the winter months but is active and served by supply clergy during June, July and August. Looks exactly like this picture on the outside. Inside the pews are made of slabs of log that probably were harvested from the well known “big woods.” People who attend are folks with cabins in the area. Many have long connections with the little church as evidenced by the names observed in the adjacent cemetery. Too far off the highway 94 corridor for notice by the hurrying crowd. Churches like this were built where Bishop Whipple designated. In Minnesota we call them Whipple churches. For more information, contact Rev Ben Scott. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Dan McDonald says: Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 22, 2018 at 5:14 am There are quite a few of these carpenter gothic churches in Florida, up and down the St. John’s River, and a good example with St. Bartholomew’s, High Springs. Trinity Episcopal Church in Groton, South Dakota, is the last remaining church designed by renowned architect and Episcopalian Richard Upjohn. Photo courtesy of Groton Community Historical Society[Episcopal News Service] In the center of a little former frontier town in northeastern South Dakota stands an Episcopal sole survivor.The one-room wooden Trinity Episcopal Church was built only three years after the town of Groton was organized as a railroad stop in 1881. Groton is now a city of 1,400 people, according to the last U.S. census.This simple, white-painted church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, representing significant mid-19th century revival architecture, exploration and settlement. Properties listed in the register are deemed important in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering and culture. It’s the official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation.The church’s cachet also stems from its architectural design. It was created by renowned church architect and Episcopalian Richard Upjohn, who designed the majestic Trinity Church Wall Street in downtown Manhattan and founded the American Institute of Architects.There once were 153 churches built from Upjohn’s designs in South Dakota, and this is the only one remaining.Perspective drawing for Trinity Episcopal Church. Photo courtesy of Groton Community Historical Society“I always took it for granted that it was there. I live two blocks from the church and walked by it every day of my life since 1965,” said Betty Breck, who is striving to keep the church preserved and open for use.She’s part of the Groton Community Historical Society that is seeking help from the public to gather enough donations to be able to apply for a grant from the City of Deadwood, South Dakota, and the Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission, which is set up to help historic preservation throughout the state.A circa 1870 oil portrait depicts architect and Episcopalian Richard Upjohn. Photo: Wikimedia CommonsUpjohn, a heavily indebted English cabinetmaker, migrated to the United States in 1829, gradually becoming one of North America’s famous architects. “The buildings he designed reflected new currents in the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States and its parent, the Church of England,” according to an article by Joan R. Gundersen, the soon-to retire archivist for the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh.Gundersen, who lived in Northfield, Minnesota, from 1975 to 1989 while she was a tenured member of the St. Olaf College history department, wrote about Upjohn’s influence in “Rural Gothic: Building Episcopal Churches on the Minnesota Frontier,” published in Minnesota History, a quarterly publication of the Minnesota Historical Society.Upjohn helped spread the Gothic revival in church architecture to the United States with his work on Trinity Church Wall Street and several other major churches.“More important for the architect’s and the revival’s overall impact was the fact that Upjohn donated plans for many small churches and made it a policy to design one mission church each year,” she said.“With these plans, they could build churches very quickly,” Breck said. “The directions were so complete. It’s fascinating to me how they did it.”Betty Breck is trying to preserve Trinity Episcopal Church in Groton, South Dakota, due to its historic architectural design and significance. Photo courtesy of Groton Community Historical SocietyUpjohn’s practical plans for building small churches quickly, affordably and with local materials and craftsmen in rural America started a wave of 19th-century church building, beginning in western New York sometime in the 1820s, Breck learned.It wasn’t until the 1820s that the Episcopal Church looked toward the American frontier, Gundersen wrote. That’s when the General Convention founded the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, which first began work on the immediate frontiers of western Pennsylvania, New York and New England. Western New York was booming, thanks to the completion in 1825 of the Erie Canal. (Today, the Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out its mission under the name of the DFMS.)Eventually, Upjohn gathered plans for a church, chapel, rectory and schoolhouse that he published as “Upjohn’s Rural Architecture” in 1852.Then the building spread with the missionary movement throughout the Western frontier. In 1880, there were 22 chapels and 73 churches built with Upjohn’s plans in Minnesota, Breck said.Trinity, Groton, was a consecrated church in the Episcopal Diocese of South Dakota until the diocese deeded the property to the Brown County Historical Society in 1975. It joined the National Register in 1983. But the society struggled to take care of the church, so in 2016, the Groton Community Historical Society was formed for the express purpose of owning the church to maintain and preserve it.The interior of Trinity Episcopal Church in Groton, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of the Rev. Robert HillThe church is exactly as it was in the 1880s, except for the chimney, turn-of-the-century wiring and the removal of an oil furnace on the floor. The ecclesiastical furniture — including the original pump organ, pews, altar and pulpit — are the same.Once the roof is fixed, Breck envisions weekly music events and maybe use as a destination wedding chapel. She has an event planned May 27, with pump organ music.When Breck started doing research on this church, she had no idea about its history.“It was just this sweet little church down the road. When you sit in there, it just works its spell on you. It speaks to the spirituality of our ancestors here,” Breck said.“They worked hard, and they took time to build a church not only for their Episcopal congregation, but by others also. It was a community center, the center of the town and held everything together on the prairie.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Dr. Stan Lightner says: The Rev. Alison Martin says: Submit an Event Listing David Luther Woodward says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more