December 31

‘Localized Great Depression’ at ‘Ground Zero’ in Kentucky and West Virginia

first_img‘Localized Great Depression’ at ‘Ground Zero’ in Kentucky and West Virginia FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Largely the result of a wounded coal sector, there are counties in West Virginia where more than one-third of the citizens are out of work.The situation — the equivalent of a localized Great Depression, according to one economist — has hit hardest in the Central Appalachia coalfields. The region has long depended on coal and as its seams have gotten thinner and more difficult to reach, the industry has also been forced to fight anemic domestic and global demand in the face of low natural gas prices, government regulations and a global economic stall.Some of the largest mines in the country such as Peabody Energy Corp. and Arch Coal Inc.’s operations in Wyoming are also just beginning to issue large-scale layoff notices to its employees. However, for years, places in West Virginia and Kentucky have watched as miners are laid off by the hundreds in a region with few other options.A recent SNL Energy analysis showed most of the job losses that occurred in the coal sector have occurred in a “ground zero” of sorts, a narrow band of 16 counties that extend across eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia. Another analysis showed coal job losses rapidly accelerated in 2015, with the industry shedding nearly 35% of its employment since a near-term peak at the end of 2011.Retired Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., told S&P Global Market Intelligence that the current political environment could stymie progress for years. He encouraged coal miners to keep their heads up as the state endures the effects of the sector’s collapse.Rockefeller insisted in a keynote speech at the conference things are not going to get any better for the coal sector, regardless of whether the country votes a Republican or Democrat into the White House. A Goldman Sachs report earlier in the year declared the fate of thermal coal “irreversible” and an SNL Energy analysis showed 1 in 4 tons of the coal recently produced in the U.S. comes from a company recently filing bankruptcy.Rockefeller said it is time for the state to own its challenges and find the will and leadership to do what needs to be done.Rockefeller said the state has been “so coal-dominated” in its economy, psychology and politics that people are afraid to speak up, but now is the time to “take control of the future.”“As we go through this process, let’s not go through it grimly. … What you do is you surround yourself with hope, which is the most important word in the English language as far as I’m concerned,” Rockefeller said.Joyce McConnell, provost and vice president for academic affairs, opened the conference with a call to focus on three pillars of policy to address coal’s downturn: education, health and prosperity. She said the college has a “moral obligation” to examine opportunities to improve energy and sustainability.“We knew in 2008 the signs were already on the wall about the decline of the coal industry and the need to transition our economy from one purely based on extraction — whether it’s coal or gas or oil or timber — to one that’s an economy that is not only knowledge-based, but is innovation-based,” McConnell said.“It takes time to diversify an economy and we have to think about the near-term, the middle-term and the far-term. That’s the human reality.”The situation is dire. John Deskins, director of the West Virginia University Bureau of Business and Economic Research, said his organization is working on the latest economic forecast and the next issue is about to be even less optimistic for coal than before. In 2008, Deskins noted, West Virginia produced 150 million to 160 million tons of coal. In 2016, he forecasts production could go as a low as 80 million tons.“Statewide mine output during the first quarter of 2016 will likely come in at its lowest level in decades and could be the lowest total for quarterly production outside of a strike episode since the 1930s,” said Brian Lego, BBER research assistant professor, in a news release from the bureau’s latest state business index. “Environmental policy, falling export demand, warmer-than-normal winter weather and increased utilization of natural gas by electric utilities have all combined to weigh heavily on coal production.”The decline in coal production has also created a sizable hole in the state’s economy due to lower severance tax collections.Deskins said the popular political notion in the state that a new presidential administration could reverse coal’s fate is “not at all true.” Among coal’s challenges are low natural gas prices, and even in West Virginia, the gas and oil sector is projected to soon surpass coal in share of the gross domestic product.Deskins said that though the pain is largely concentrated in certain pockets of the state, his office has officially declared West Virginia to be in a recession.Appalachian Power Co. President and COO Charles Patton said the writing is on the wall for change in the electric sector.“Once you get through the political morass, at the end of the day, most Americans believe there is something going on and we need to take steps to address it,” Patton said. “That belief is common knowledge in business. … The fact that technology has driven down the cost of renewables to such a point and there is sufficient capacity out there, all utilities are beginning to change their view of the future.”Full article ($):Replacing Coal, part 1: ‘Great Depression’ grips pockets of Mountain Statelast_img read more

December 31

New Residential Requirement to Lift California Solar Sales 14%

first_imgNew Residential Requirement to Lift California Solar Sales 14% FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:California made national news this week in becoming the first state to require that solar be installed on virtually all new homes. The California Energy Commission approved the proposal on May 9, as part of an update to the state’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The codes apply to all new residences and major home renovations on buildings under three stories, beginning in 2020.For the U.S. solar industry, the new standards are expected to boost residential solar sales 14 percent over a four-year timeframe from 2020 through 2023, according to a new analysis from GTM Research. That’s an upside of nearly 650 megawatts (DC) compared to GTM’s base-case forecast for the residential solar segment.According to the California Energy Commission (CEC), nearly 75,000 new homes are expected to be built statewide in 2020. Based on that analysis, new-build solar will account for 23 percent of new installations in 2020 — or 222 megawatts.While the average residential solar system size in California is 6.8 kilowatts, GTM Research assumes a system size of 3 kilowatts for new-build residential solar, based on CEC assumptions for the energy efficiency of new homes and historical data from the CEC’s New Solar Homes Partnership. These solar systems are smaller because new homes are more efficient, and they will become increasingly so as new efficiency requirements for things like lighting and ventilation also take effect in 2020.According to a report conducted by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. on behalf of the CEC, solar system sizes under the new rules will range from 2.7 kilowatts in seaside San Diego to 5.7 kilowatts in sizzling Palm Springs. The upside for the solar industry could also be greater depending on solar trends.More: California Rooftop Solar Mandate To Boost Sales 14% Over 4 Yearslast_img read more

December 30

The Moment: Comeback Kid

first_imgFast Ascent: After losing his legs in Iraq, Calhoun rehabilitated himself on the slopes. he’s now a member of the U.S. Alpine Ski Team.The journey of Heath Calhoun started simply in the mountains of Southwest Virginia. After growing up in the small coalfields town of Grundy, Va., Calhoun decided to follow a family path and enlist in the U.S. Army. His life changed forever, though, in 2003, when he was serving in Iraq and a rocket-propelled grenade struck his convoy’s truck. His injuries were so severe that both of his legs had to be amputated.Upon returning home for intensive rehabilitation, Calhoun immediately found solace in sports. In 2005 he hand-cycled 4,200 miles across the country to raise funds and awareness for the Wounded Warrior Project.  He also excelled on the slopes. After taking part in a ski clinic in Colorado, it was apparent that Calhoun had a knack for adaptive mono-skiing, so apparent that coaches encouraged him to train seriously for competitive racing. In 2009, he placed first in the super G category of the U.S. Adaptive Alpine National Championships, and the next year Calhoun earned a spot on the U.S. Alpine Skiing Team at the 2010 Winter Paralympics in Vancouver. Now, in a remarkable twist of fate, this native of small town Appalachia has become a full-time professional ski racer, traveling around the world with the U.S. team for training and competition. While it’s not easy for this father of three to be away from his current home in Tennessee, he’s focused on chasing a dream that will hopefully lead to a gold medal at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. “Soon after I was hit in 2003 and came back home from Iraq, I was taken to Colorado as part of my rehabilitation. One of the first things I did was try skiing, and I picked it up quickly. It was a freeing experience for me. At first, being in a wheelchair without limbs, I was having a really difficult time getting around. As soon as I was strapped into the mono-ski and got onto the mountain, I could go anywhere anyone else could go. Whether it was the actual runs or the chairlift, I no longer had to look for the handicap accessible lane. Being on a level playing field was something that I hadn’t experienced since losing my legs. From that point on, it’s all I wanted to do.A defining moment for me was carrying the United States flag at the 2010 Paralympics. I felt a tremendous amount of respect to once again be able to carry the nation’s flag, and the feeling was heightened knowing that the rest of the U.S. team voted to have me carry it. It brought me back full circle.A typical day for me now involves waking up and hitting the slopes for three to four hours of skiing. Then I grab some lunch, and head to the gym for the rest of the day. That’s my schedule at least five days a week.It’s amazing to be racing on a world level. Before getting hit in Iraq, I had only skied a few times in my life. I constantly think about how amazing it is that I am now on the world stage in this sport. It still feels odd being a Southern skier. Most of the other guys on the team grew up skiing out West, so I’ve had to learn every aspect of the sport in a short amount of time.I currently call Clarksville, Tenn., home, but I travel all over the world, learning about it in a way that would have never been previously possible.I don’t get to see my kids as much as I want, and as much as they want. I make sure the time that I have with them is quality. But I believe pursuing professional skiing is important because it sets an example for them. They’ve watched me overcome something traumatic and turn it into something positive. They were with me in Vancouver in 2010, and they’re planning to go to Sochi. It’s not too often in life that you’re able to give your kids this type of experience.The buzz for me definitely comes from the speed and adrenaline, but I am in this for the long haul. There’s nothing quite like finishing a run, passing through the corral, and turning around in anticipation to check your time and see how you did. That’s an incredible feeling for me. The goal is to keep getting better, and that comes from constant practice. I am competing against people that have been doing this a lot longer than me, so I have to keep working hard. This sport has given me a reason to try again.”last_img read more

December 30

Mountain Mama | Packing for the Islands

first_imgIt’s getting real –  Tobin and I leave in ten days for the Islands. My basement apartment consists of piles of snacks, mounds of gear and a mishmash of sailing books and swimsuits. As I walk from around my pile surveying the stuff strewn about in a bewildered state, questions swirl in my brain.What should I bring along to keep Tobin occupied when the wind is too strong to sail? Should I bring a lock to secure our dinghy from real pirates? I keep wondering if I have everything we’ll need and then start panicking that I don’t really even know what everything consists of, sending me on buying sprees.How will I keep all this shit organized so that the other two crew members don’t mutiny?  There’s not much space on a mono-haul 35-footer. Another blogger put it best, “the hull is the sort which the United Nations would probably condemn as unfit for human habitation.” No need to add puzzle pieces and Lego bits to further clutter the tight space.Someone told me, “we pack our fears.”  It’s true – solar-powered lanterns, back-up bug spray, redundant clothing (we’ll be wearing bikinis, hats, and sunglasses most of the time), GPS devices, and emergency blankets.  By this point, I’m hemorrhaging money and faced with the constraint of limited packing space. Then it dawns on me that all this stuff is a misplaced effort to make up for my lack of skill behind the helm. I’ve come face-to-face with my fear that I don’t have enough sailing experience to be in charge.Sure I want to be prepared, but if I pack to deal with every bad situation my creative mind conjures, we’ll never leave the dock. While tempting to confuse more stuff with a better journey, I realize that comfort isn’t a commodity. Even if it were possible, I wouldn’t want to banish the lows because that’s all part of the adventure and makes for the best stories.I’m devoting the rest of this rainy day to a proper shake down, preparing for the inevitable (lots of sun exposure and bouts of seasickness) and trust that I’ll be able to handle whatever else comes my way. I’m reminding myself of all the pickles I’ve found myself over the years. Thinking back on the worst travel mishaps, I remember the kindness of strangers and my ability to get myself out of bad situations. More often than not, the solution involved a quick smile, a creative mind, and a steady dose of humor, things that don’t take up any space in my duffel bag.last_img read more

December 30

Well Hung

first_imgFull confession time: I’m not a hammock guy. Now, hold off before you start typing your hate mail. I understand why a lot of people like to spend the night in hammocks. They’re relatively lightweight alternatives to tents that pack easy and set up even easier. Slap a couple of straps around two trees and you’re golden. No need to clear a tent site of rocks and sticks, no need to even find level ground. I get it. And I understand why a lot of backpackers have come around to the hammock revolution in recent years. I’m just not one of them, mainly because I like to sleep flat, on firm ground. I don’t want to curl up like I’m back in my mother’s womb. But mostly, the slightest bit of movement from a hammock makes me throw up in my mouth. I know; I’m a delicate flower.So I wasn’t super stoked when I got a new Lawson Hammock to test out. I don’t want to go out like Jimmi Hendricks, drowning in my own vomit, which I’m convinced is what will happen if I spend the night in a hammock. Alas, I’m a journalist, so I set up the hammock and faced my fears. Luckily, Lawson’s Hammock isn’t like most other hammocks on the market. It’s more like a one-person version of those whimsical tree tents that came out of nowhere a couple of years ago. While most hammocks are built to sag and cradle you in its parachute-walled caress, the Lawson has tension polls on either end of the “floor” that give you a relatively flat surface to lay on. Yes, the floor gives with your body, but add a good sleeping pad, and you increase the stiffness while still being able to enjoy a little bit of the give that hammocks are known for. Even better, the Lawson has a built in screen, sort of like a one-man bivy, that gives you a secure “tube” to keep the bugs and creepy crawlers out. Add the rainfly, and you’ve got a dry nest sandwiched between the trees. It took me a couple of tries to set the Lawson up (the strap system isn’t as idiot-proof as some of the others on the market), but once the hammock was up, I dug it. It’s spacious, comfortable and doesn’t feel like you’re being wrapped in a parachute. It’s versatile too—if you’re in a spot without properly spaced trees (nature can be difficult sometimes), you can set the Lawson up on the ground like a bivy. Like I said, it’s more of a tent than a hammock. But a tent that you can hang between two trees. 4lbs; $169; lawsonhammock.comRelated Articles:last_img read more

December 30

Mountain Mama: A Q & A with Mountain Biking Mom Megan Hutton

first_imgA month ago I attended the 5Point Film Festival and participated in a panel about women in the outdoors.During the question period, and audience member raised her hand and said, “I love what you’ve all said about women being inspired by seeing other women in adventure sports. But after seeing last night’s films, my son and daughter went home with very different ideas about possibility.”The room fell silent. She was right. Most of the films featured men and told their stories. The women played supporting roles or mentees, not leaders driving the narrative. Anna Levesque, a professional kayaker who has devoted her life to empowering women on the water, said, “We need to take a Go Pro on our adventures. Nobody is going to tell our stories for us.”Chills covered my arms.  As I sat on stage with other women in the outdoors industry, I pictured the next big adventure for Tobin and me. That’s when I got the crazy idea to video our adventure. I want other parents to see that while it might not be easy, it’s certainly possible and definitely rewarding to spend time outdoors. A month later, I’ve consulted with videographers and invested in navigational charts for route planning. Somewhere between logistics and sketching out the necessary gear, doubt crept in and became a constant companion. I wondered if the idea was too big or dangerous or crazy. I second-guessed my own skills and ability to effectively parent. I worried about finding the time to make this happen with so many other projects up in the air.That’s when I started looking for inspiration from other single parents adventuring with their kids.I sat down with Megan Hutton, a single mom who races mountain bikes. Her contagious adventurous spirit, left so excited that I wanted to share our conversation here.megan2How do you balance your own pursuits with raising a child?I didn’t have family in the area, and didn’t have friends jumping at the chance to watch my kid while I worked out. Money was tight. Even with those obstacles, I had to work out because it kept me sane and I wanted to model a healthy and active lifestyle for my son.When my son was younger and I was getting used to life as a single mom, I was tired most of the time. I became flexible about riding.The only time I could be sure I’d get on my bike was when my son visited his dad. I’d sign up for a mountain bike race on those weekends. I knew that if I registered and paid money, then I was committed and would show up. Races back then weren’t competitive for me. I raced off the couch, happy to get on my bike and catch up with friends. Race results became irrelevant.Now that my son is older, we ride together as often as we can. He comes to my races and watches me ride. He’s also been doing some downhill races of his own.Sometimes I feel selfish asking for the time and space required to work out without my son, but who I am as a person and mom depends on me nurturing my passion for the outdoors.What obstacles have you faced when adventuring with kids?Without a doubt, spending time with kids in the outdoors adds extra work and most adventures become more difficult. I have to remind myself that taking my son along also multiplies the rewards. Three years ago I broke my knee. Getting injured not only meant that I couldn’t ride, I wasn’t even supposed to be home alone. Some people blamed me for taking risks and slung blame.“Being a mom should come first,” they said.“Riding is selfish and dangerous,” others said.“Taking risks jeopardizes your ability to parent,” some said.Labels like “bad mom” box in women, until moms worry it’s selfish for asking for the time and space required for self-care.I became so worried about what other people thought that I became afraid to post a picture of me riding on Instagram.How did you create a space where you could own riding bikes and adventuring with your son?Other single moms inspired me to let go of the limiting self-conscious believes about taking time.  Seeing another single mom pursue her passion for riding helped me own taking the space to be the best person I can, which includes bikes.I redefined what it means to me to be a mom, a definition that now includes taking care of myself.  I don’t buy into the crazy idea out there that once you give birth, your life revolves around your child and you cease being a person with distinct needs and desires. Creating a community with other women changed my life. I need their support and together we become empowered. I continue to prioritize putting myself out there to build my tribe. When I meet moms who aren’t already outdoorsy, I invite them to come along and offer them experiences in the outdoors.How do you motivate your son to get outside?There are days when it’s challenging to get kids outside. Some times I have to push my son to go and ultimately he ends up having fun. There’s a fine line between when do we need to nudge our kids to get out the door and try something new versus pushing a child too much.Even with the best of intentions and lots of trip planning, there are times when things don’t go well. I’ve done the research and thought a trail would be appropriate for my son’s skill level and it turns out that it’s a bit too much. When the trail turns out to be tougher than expected, I do my best to keep it positive and not get frustrated. Each time we go outdoors, we both learn valuable life lessons.I’ve learned about patience, what to bring and when to turn around.My son has learned to keep going to get out of it, that sitting down and quitting isn’t an option.What advice do you have for other parents?Don’t wait until you have it all figured out – there will never be a time when everyone is in the perfect mood, when the weather is just right, when there are no nagging household tasks.  Get outside despite the fact that the stars aren’t perfectly aligned.What’s one dream trip for you and your son?My dream for us is to backpack the Art Loeb trail. A couple of months ago we went on our first overnighter to test the waters. We’ve fine-tuned the packing list and adjusted the weight of his pack.last_img read more

December 30

Bike park in Buncombe County, NC to close due to landfill expansion

first_imgThe Alexander Mountain Bike Park in Alexander, NC will permanently close to the public on Friday, Jan. 31 and will be developed as an expansion of dirt borrow space for the Buncombe County Landfill. The park’s multi-user trail system has been around for 20 years and was managed by Recreation Services, but the land has always been located on Buncombe County Landfill property. Due to expansion plans, the park can no longer remain open due to “safety and risk concerns.”  The Mountain Bike Park closure does not affect Alexander River Park, one of seven river parks in Buncombe County offering access to the French Broad River.  “Buncombe County Solid Waste has been proud to support the Alexander Mountain Bike Park through the years,” said Solid Waste Director Dane Pedersen. “We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause for all the users of the park; however, it is no longer safe nor feasible to keep the park open with future expansion plans.”  Alexander Mountain Park contained 7 miles of challenging single-track trail and was open to hikers, bikers and equestrians.  center_img “Any time we lose public open spaces it’s unfortunate, but the County’s growth necessitates the landfill’s expansion to protect the health and safety of all citizens,” said Buncombe Recreation Services Director Josh O’Conner. “Alexander Mountain Bike Park has been a much-loved fixture in our community, and we are grateful to all of the community organizations who have helped to maintain the park through that time.” See the press release here: https://www.buncombecounty.org/countycenter/news-detail.aspx?id=18393&fbclid=IwAR2npQJ4semPV5IfJ56c36HNSiKOG5zUVGEBtBt0fpWIr-sU3keRUs5c1ZMlast_img read more

December 30

Virginia non-profit asks residents to save their oyster shells to support baby oysters

first_imgGrizzly bear attacks mountain biker in southern Montana The ultra-rare blue calamintha bee was first described in 2011. It was recorded at only four locations totaling just 16 square miles of pine scrub habitat at Central Florida’s Lake Wales Ridge, according to a blog post by the Florida Museum. Scientist were unsure if the blue bee still existed until this spring, when the bee was spotted once again. Wildlife officials say the attack does not appear to be predatory and authorities are not searching for the bear. The trail is closed while the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks agency investigates. “I was open to the possibility that we may not find the bee at all so that first moment when we spotted it in the field was really exciting,” said Chase Kimmel, a postdoctoral researcher with the Florida Museum of Natural History. Kimmel and his advisor, Jaret Daniels, are working on a two-year project to study the bees. Their study could help determine whether the blue bee qualifies for protection under the Endangered Species Act.   Virginia non-profit asks residents to save their oyster shells to support baby oysters Rare blue bee spotted at Florida’s Lake Wales Ridgecenter_img Each year, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation receives several thousand bushels of oyster shells from restaurants in Virginia. The shells are recycled into new homes for baby oysters and planted in waterways around the region, the Virginian-Pilot reports. But this year, due to restaurant restrictions caused by the coronavirus, the non-profit is running low on donated shells. Photo from Getty Images A man out for a mountain bike ride on Memorial Day in Big Sky, Montana got the surprise of a lifetime when he rounded a sharp corner on a trail and came face to face with a grizzly bear. The bear attacked the biker, but the man, in this 60’s, was able to walk away and find help. He was later airlifted to a hospital with injuries to his face and back and is in stable but critical condition. To help support the oyster population, the foundation is asking the public to drop off their shells when they eat local oysters at home. “You can help bring back oysters in the Chesapeake whenever you drop off those empty shells,” Jackie Shannon, Virginia oyster restoration manager for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, said in a statement. Shell drop-off bins are located throughout Hampton Roads. View a full list of drop-off locations here. last_img read more

December 20

Argentina Considers an Alternative Stadium for the “Monumental” After Maradona’s Complains

first_imgBy Dialogo June 18, 2009 Argentina requested FIFA fit out Rosario Central Stadium as an alternative to “Monumental” stadium for the 2010 South Africa World Cup’s qualifying round for the next match, in which Argentina will compete against Brazil, as officially announced on Wednesday. The decision was made public after controversy arose between the River Plate team, owner of the Monumental, and the national team, Diego Maradona, over the conditions of the field and the installations where Argentina plays locally. “Yes, the Rosario Central Stadium was requested (of FIFA). Currently, it offers better conditions regarding infrastructure,” Julio Grondona, the President of the Argentine Football Association (AFA), confirmed. Maradona had bitterly complained about the conditions of Monumental’s field before his team defeated Colombia (1-0) on June 6, and he had described it as a shocking embarrassment, a “potrero” (piece of land improvised as field) and a ‘picadero’ (where horses are trained.) In response to these statements, River Plate sent a letter of complains to the AFA this week characterizing Maradona’s expressions as “rude and excessive.” “There is no doubt that it will result in a loss of money (if we change venue for a smaller place), but the points we need (for the classification) are more valuable than money,” Grondona, who has just been re-elected as one of FIFA’s vice presidents, added. In September Argentina will risk a great deal of its luck, urgently needed to gain points when confronting qualifying leaders Brazil (27) on the 15th. “I cannot say if it is possible to play well or not (at River Stadium). The mistake was not having an alternative. If the river (de la Plata) rises, it will flood (the Monumental), so where would we play? We need an alternative,” said Grondona. In the standings behind the Brazilians, Chile (26), Paraguay (24), Argentina (22), Ecuador (20), Uruguay (18), Colombia (17), Venezuela (17), Bolivia (12) and Peru (7) are positioned. “The coach has every right to express his opinion, but River Plate felt offended, since the team made a huge effort to improve the field and the conditions were good,” complained Julio Macchi, River’s vice-president. The Monumental’s field, with a capacity of 50,000 people, had been damaged during a concert by the popular local rock band “Los Piojos.” Macchi said that “River considers the terms in which Maradona spoke to be insulting, and Grondona apologized to River, so that’s enough,” bringing the controversy to an end. However, River’s counterattack went further, since they inquired of the AFA whether Maradona had undergone the obligatory psychophysical tests before hiring him as coach, as well as other contractual requirements. “We should have this information as supportive documentation in case a club member requests it,” said Macchi. Since the mid-70s the official headquarters of the national team has been Monumental stadium, where they became World Cup champions when the country hoested the tournament in 1978. Their only loss in the South American qualifying rounds was their humiliating and heavy 5-0 defeat by Colombia on September 5, 1993, on their way to the United States World Cup 1994. An antecedent of official matches between Argentina and Brazil in the “Gigante de Arroyito,” Rosario Central’s headquarters, 300 km north of Buenos Aires, with a capacity of 35,000 spectators, was the goalless draw in the second phase of Argentina’s World Cup 1978.last_img read more

December 20

Bachelet Warns That Rebuilding Will Last Through Piñera’s Entire Term

first_img “I’m emotionally affected, because the country didn’t deserve this,” the president confessed to the broadcaster ADN, her voice faltering, after falling silent for several seconds while describing the desolate scene she found on traveling to the affected regions immediately after the disaster. For this reason, she said that an investigation needs to be opened into the reasons why a tsunami warning was not issued in time. “Chile has to have confidence; we are in a position to move forward,” Bachelet affirmed, admitting – nevertheless – that “it’s going to take time.” The president considered unacceptable the failure of the alarm system set up to warn of the risk of ‘sea-quakes,’ a phenomenon that followed Saturday’s earthquake and flattened numerous coastal towns. By Dialogo March 05, 2010 “Practically all of the next administration” will have to be dedicated to responding to the emergency and the rebuilding of the broad region affected by the earthquake, which has left 802 dead and an undetermined number of injured among its two million victims. The president announced that she and the ministers responsible for the agencies most directly involved in responding to the humanitarian emergency will meet on Thursday with President-Elect Sebastián Piñera, who will take office on the 11th. The rebuilding of Chile following the disastrous earthquake that devastated the center and south of the country early Saturday will last for practically the entire four years that Sebastián Piñera will be in charge, Chilean president Michelle Bachelet affirmed today. last_img read more