Jobs play a thinker

first_imgNo related posts. From the print editionYou’ve just received your new iPhone and its purported megabytes of empty digital space. You plan to fill it with messages and photos of your friends, family and cat, but to your surprise, your new gadget is already occupied. It contains photos of the phone’s birthplace in a Chinese factory.When monologist Mike Daisey heard that this actually happened to someone, he was intrigued, and he went to China in 2010 to investigate the source of the world’s beloved Apple products. What he found  became the subject of his play, “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs.” After seeing the Little Theatre Group’s iteration of Daisey’s play, audience members will never look at their iPhones or MacBooks the same way.Friday night just 25 seats were filled, with double that available at the Laurence Olivier Theatre, a modern, concrete affair with a basement Shakespeare bar. As the lights dimmed and the stage lit up, five actors shuffled on stage and took seats in chairs facing the audience. Director Pilar Saavedra-Vela divided the monologue among the actors, who took turns portraying the narrator Daisey and other characters during the two-hour production.The narrators took the audience from the college-dropout days of Steve Jobs to his development of Apple, and then they explored Daisey’s own fascination with technology, experience inside Chinese factories and discussions with Chinese union organizers.“I found this piece touching, and so important to bring up,” said Saavedra-Vela, who had never before directed a play. “Everyone has so many items in their homes that are made in China. Technology is so pervasive in our lives and this piece helps us to see a side we’ve not contemplated.”Controversy around the play surfaced after the public radio show “This American Life” aired an excerpt from the monologue. A journalist in China heard the show and reported that Daisey exaggerated aspects of his play, for instance, the armed guards surrounding the factories. Only police and military personnel in China are allowed to carry weapons. Daisey later admitted to embellishing his play for theatrical effect, but the version presented by the Little Theater Group contained none of the inaccuracies.Some theater critics have defended Daisey, arguing that even if details were misconstrued, the fact remains that employees in many electronics companies overseas experience terrible working conditions to deliver the world’s hundred-dollar iPods and thousand-dollar MacBooks. One particularly egregious example Daisey’s monologue highlights is that of N-hexane,the chemical used to clean the screens of electronic devices. It causes neurological damage, which the actors portrayed with vivid and disturbing tremors.The play concludes with a call to action. Actors ask for those moved by the production to think twice about upgrading one’s electronics, to educate themselves about where products come from and to spread the messages of Daisey’s play.Tom Humes, one of the actors, said this work is more like a documentary and it has a different goal than the usual productions seen from the Little Theater Group. “Usually we want to make you laugh or cry, but with this one we want you to think,” he said. “This gives you a different look at the icon of Steve Jobs and the downside to his empire.”The Little Theatre Group is staging the play for one more weekend at the Laurence Olivier Theatre in San José, at Avenida 2, Calle 28, next to the Sala Garbo, 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Call 8858-1446 or visit www.littletheatregroup.org Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Dbacks president Derrick Hall Franchise still f

first_img D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’ Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation The resurgent Arizona Cardinals, still basking in the afterglow of a 19-13 overtime win against the Dallas Cowboys last Sunday, face their biggest challenge yet against the newly minted NFC West champion San Francisco 49ers.The Niners (10-2) may have iced their first NFC West crown in nine years, but there is still a lot at stake for San Francisco, who remains in the hunt for a first-round postseason bye. The Cardinals need a win against their division rivals to keep their faint playoff hopes alive. After an abysmal 1-6 start to the season, the Cardinals now have a pulse after going 4-1 since the start of November to inch to within two games of a wild card berth. Comments   Share   What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke This weekend’s matchup seems to boil down to the battle between defenses. The Cardinals have a tall order before them, facing the league’s most feared “D” – who will surely be raring to go and ready to pounce.The Niners defense leads the NFL in points per game, allowing a mere 13.4 – a mark that is the best in franchise history. They are also the only team in the league to not allow a rushing TD.The Cardinals are well aware that the keys to this game will be to gain more rushing yardage while limiting turnovers.The last time these two teams faced each other in Week 11, the Cards turned the ball over a whopping five times in a 23-7 defeat.“You can’t do what we did. We gave them two early turnovers, field position,” head coach Ken Whisenhunt said. “Our defense bailed us out but we never really got a chance to do anything offensively and that’s what’s going to be so critical for us.” Wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald also acknowledged the importance of his team buckling down on turnovers.“You go back to the Monday Night Football game two years ago, we turned the ball over seven times,” Fitzgerald said. center_img Top Stories “We turned the ball over five times here at home and turned the ball over five times up there last time, so we have to give ourselves a fighting chance by not turning the football over.”And, while much has been made of the Niners sterling defense, Arizona’s has held its own as of late. Added Fitzgerald: “Our defense is playing good ball right now.”Good ball, indeed. The Cardinals had a season-high five sacks last week vs. the Cowboys. Whisenhunt credits his team’s ability to put more pressure on the quarterback, as well as not succumbing to one’s own personal goals.“Sometimes it’s about matchups, sometimes it’s the scheme of defense that you’re playing against your opponent,” Whisenhunt stated.“You’d like to think that it doesn’t matter, that we are going to be versatile enough that we can have those days where we get different guys with individual sacks but I know those guys are driven to get a whole bunch on their own,” he said. “I’m sure every one of those guys wants to get those five sacks for themselves.”There’s no question that everyone will be gunning for Niners quarterback Alex Smith, who has been sacked 34 times this season, but not once by Cardinals defenders in their first meeting this year. “Our goals aren’t to get sacks, it’s to get quarterback hits,” says defensive end Calais Campbell. “So, if we go out there and get quarterback hits, sacks are going to come.”Arizona Sports’ Craig Grialou contributed to this story. Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right awaylast_img read more